"promoting peace activities informed by peace research"
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IPRA Foundation News

 

The application period for the 2018-2019 Senesh Fellowship is now open.  

 

Two Peace Research Grants were awarded in May, 2017:

 

Ashley Jonathan Clements (New Zealand) “The Frontlines of Negotiation: Advancing Humanitarian Negotiations with Armed Groups in Yemen” 2017

Holly Guthrey (USA) “Enhancing Security and Development on the Ground? Exploring the Effect of Top-down and Bottom-up Post-Conflict Justice and Reconciliation Processes” 2017

 

PJSA Conference 2017

PJSA 2017 Conference, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, October 25 –  28, 2017, https://www.peacejusticestudies.org/conference

 

Peace Research Grant awardee Katherine Layton has a wonderful new book just out based on her IPRA Foundation research: Chechens: Culture and Society – read all about it on her webpage.

 

Have you ever wondered why the world is so violent? So have many others. Many scholars and activists around the world are concerned about increasing levels of violence and are interested in providing a world-wide network for peace researchers seeking nonviolent ways to resolve conflict. Peace research has been defined as systematic observation or study of conflict phenomena and peace strategies. Peace researchers explain how the conditions of peace can be advanced and/or the causes of war and other forms of violence be removed.

The IPRA Foundation describes peace research thus:
Peace Research is a rigorous investigation into the causes of conflict and an examination of alternatives to violence.  Peace researchers inform peace activities that inspire visions of a peaceful world.

The International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRAF), a non-profit, tax-exempt organization founded in 1990 to further the purposes of IPRA, has sought to enhance the processes of peace. IPRAF has engaged in peacemaking projects in the Middle East and the Balkans, provided scholarships for women from the developing world to pursue graduate education, allowed peace researchers from all around the world to travel to peace research conferences, and funded small peace research grants in places as diverse as Argentina, Bosnia, the Philippines, and Uganda.

The IPRA Foundation began as a depository of funds brought in by people with specific peace projects. Funds were invested safely in socially acceptable enterprises and paid out as needed. IPRAF collects funds to support peace research and administers several projects. To see the current projects of the IPRA Foundation, click here.

Read testimonials about the IPRA Foundation Peace Research Grant awards.