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TESTIMONIALS FROM IPRAF SMALL PEACE RESEARCH GRANTEES

“The IPRA Foundation grant helped us get off the ground with our project. After the initial pilot that you helped fund, we were able to obtain $60,000 in funding from UNICEF and the Macarthur Foundation to expand and extend the project. We’ve just confirmed a $200,000 grant from UNICEF and the UK’s Department for International Development to extend the research another year. The research has been very well received in Uganda and New York, and we’ve advised dozens of donors and NGOs on their programs in northern Uganda as a result. Your help in the very beginning was instrumental in this success. ”

Christopher Blattman, Canada
STOLEN CHILDREN, SHATTERED LIVES? A PROPOSAL FOR THE CHILD SOLDIER TRACKING PROJECT (CSTP): A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF ABDUCTION, SOLDERING, AND REINTEGRATION ON THE CHILDREN OF SUDAN AND UGANDA

 

“The Nonviolent Peaceforce conducted field research to explore three potential pilot project sites for our large-scale unarmed international “peace army”: Guatemala, Israel/Palestine, and Sri Lanka. Researchers presented their findings at the Peaceforce Convening Event in India, where 130 international delegates picked Sri Lanka for the Peaceforce Pilot Project”

Mel Duncan, USA
NONVIOLENT PEACEFORCE PILOT STUDY

 

“We are so grateful to the Foundation for our grant that enabled us to print one of our new publications. There are Realistic Alternatives. We know of one professor who has adopted the book for his classes and we have had interest expressed by others. Clearly, this publication has been significant and had some ripple effect, which may not have been possible without the IPRA Foundation’s support”

Gene Sharp, USA
THERE ARE ALTERNATIVES

 

“Our toys and violence research was started in 2002 thanks to a grant the IPRA Foundation alloted us. We are going to publish a book, illustrated with drawings and pictures. These activities take place in the framework of our Program Give Peace a Chance started in 1999 and of the Global Campaign for Peace Education of the Hague Appeal for Peace.”

Alicia Cabezudo, Argentina
WHAT IS THE MEANING OF VIOLENT TOYS?

 

“The IPRAF’s support for research on peace and conflict resolution allowed me to develop new insights on the role of economic elements in solving conflicts. Thanks to IPRAF grant, I was able to access valuable information sources, conduct interviews with key players, and perform a more comprehensive research.”

Svetlana Luca, Moldova
CASE STUDY ON CONFLICT EVOLUTION AND IMPACT OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SUPPORT

 

“The IPRAF small grant helped The Latin America Council for Peace Research (CLAIP) to publish the book that was result of a meeting with indigenous leaders from all the Americas, emphasizing the nonviolent conflict resolution of traditional societies. Besides five book presentations in Mexico, there was one in Buenos Aires, in the USA and in Canada with a personal link to the Senate in Argentina and further with the Ministry of Social Affairs in Chile. As a result, in both countries, two indigenous laws were developed, followed with one more in Columbia and in Venezuela. Finally, in Bolivia, where the President got the book personally and used it in his campaign for consolidating indigenous rights and participation, today there exists in the Congress an important indigenous representation to care for their rights.

In academic terms, the consolidation with the Canadian University of Quebec and the organization of the Innu indigenous gave birth to different visits and interchanges and this year to the organization of a common theme in the XXXII Encounter of the Network of Urban Researchers (RNIU, in Spanish).

For IPRA, it was the first book written by a Southern Regional Association dealing with issues related to peace-building, conflict resolution and prevention in a subcontinent threatened by climate change, resource access, drug war and public insecurity.”

Úrsula Oswald Spring, Mexico
PROCESSES OF NON-VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA

 

“I thank International Peace Research Association for supporting this research. Originally, I had planned to conduct this research only in Turkey, by examining Turkish-Kurdish and Turkish-Armenian conflict contexts. This grant was instrumental not only in completing the planned research, but it also made possible to extend the research to the investigation of the ethnic conflict in Burundi. The IPRA grant was used to collect research data in Turkey and in Burundi.”

Rezarta Bilali, Albania
THE EFFECT OF GROUP IDENTITY ON MEMORIES OF PAST CONFLICTS

 

“Articles that focus on the study I did that was funded by the IPRAF grant were published in five languages (English, Hebrew, French, German and Dutch – mostly in English) in:
Two relatively big news agencies (Inter press Service – 570 newspapers and magazines; and JTA – the Jewish global news agency which writes for over 100 newspapers and websites), articles in newspapers were published in leading newspapers in Israel, Belgium, Egypt (discussed the study), and this week I am interviewed for an American newspaper and the leading Italian newspaper + over 100 websites around the world put articles focusing on the study + I was interviewed for the Saudi Arabia English TV channel. Surely quite a few articles were published by the newspapers which get articles from the 2 news agencies – but I can not have information about it.

All this is until now. There is still activity in this direction and I believe more will be published. So, it seems that there is interest in the study.”

Rafi Nets-Zehngut, Israel
MAPPING THE ISRAELI COLLECTIVE MEMORY OF THE ISRAELI-ARAB/PALESTINIAN CONFLICT

 

“My work on (1) mediation and reconciliation of bloodfeuds and (2) the cross-border Balkans Peace Park have been aided by IPRA sponsorship, and presentation of work in progress at Calgary 2007 now resulting in articles:

1. (co-authored with Mentor Mustafa), “Feud Narratives: Contemporary Deployments of Kanun in Shala Valley, Northern Albania,” Anthropological Notebooks (Slovenia), pp. 87-l07. (http://www.drustvo-antropologov.si/pregled_letnikov_eng.html).

2. “Establishing the Balkans Peace Park (Albania, Montenegro, Kosovo/a). Overcoming Conflicts through Negotiation on Cross-border Environmental Protection,” Central and East European Review, Issue 2. (www.ceer.org.uk)”

Antonia Young, U.K.
Research Associate, Dept. So/An, Colgate University
Honorary Research Fellow, Univ. of Bradford, UK
Former Chair – Balkans Peace Park Committee UK
NORTHERN ALBANIAN TRIBAL SYSTEMS: AN HISTORICAL STUDY OF ETHNIC IDENTITY FORMATION AND CONFLICT IN THE SHALA RIVER VALLEY

 

“The IPRA Foundation grant has provided a very timely boost to our action research on conflict sensitivity for religious organizations in Mindanao, Philippines. For instance, the Davao Ministerial Interfaith Inc. recently hosted an IPRAF-funded workshop which brought together 15 Roman Catholic, (Protestant) Evangelical and Muslim leaders from 3 provinces to explore and document how religious leaders are using the Do No Harm / Local Capacities for Peace conflict sensitivity tool. This workshop was a key step toward next year’s publication of findings, and a major contribution to the religious leaders’ own capacity building.”

Michelle G. Garred
PhD Candidate, Richardson Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Lancaster University
Visiting Affiliate, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
CONFLICT SENSITIVITY FOR MULTI-FAITH RELIGIOUS LEADERS IN MINDANAO

 

“Through the support of the IPRA Foundation, Global Education Associates has been able to develop a much needed reference for guide for peace educators on educational evaluation. The dearth of educational evaluation in the field of peace education, and the necessary training needed to conduct it properly, has been a major dilemma that few are addressing formally. By equipping educators within our networks (the IIPE, CIPE and Global Campaign for Peace Education) with some basic knowledge and skills in evaluation theory and methods we hope to make a small, but desperately needed contribution to the field. We hope to begin distributing this resource in the near future and look forward to sharing the new research that emerges.”

Tony Jenkins
Co-Director, Peace Education Center, Teachers College Columbia University (www.tc.edu/PeaceEd)
Program Coordinator, Global Education Associates (www.g-e-a.org)
EVALUATING PEACE EDUCATION

 

“We invite applicants from Mindanao, youths and adults from tri-peole -Muslims, Christians and tribal people and those who qualify go to NIU for a one-month training on peace, mediation and conflict resolution. After the training, they go back to Mindanao and do their small projects on peace in their respective communities. After three months, we assemble them for a follow-on activity where they discussed success stories as well as problems encountered in their communities.
The program was responsible for the establishment of a network of youths and adults in Mindanao for peace and development. Indeed, the Buddy Buddy for Peace was like a Pandora’s box that paved the way for a lot of activities and opportunities for the youth and adults in Mindanao on interfaith dialogue as well as other peoples of the world. Those interested to know more about it can log to:http://www.ceas.niu.edu/PhilAccess/default.htm ”

Nagasura T. Madale, Ph.D.
In-country project coordinator Access Philippines
BUDDY BUDDY FOR PEACE

 

“1. The grant gave us (my office) an opportunity to document a model for a successful program on interfaith dialogue. As an offshoot of 9/11, interfaith dialogue has become a major response to many conflicts including Mindanao. The study has become a blueprint for this kind of endeavor.
2. The paper is now used in many peace studies program as a case study for interfaith dialogue.
3. Our exposure to the community provided a venue for academe-community interaction, hence the interfaith community has become one of the outreach areas of Ateneo faculty and students giving the academics a chance to serve the community and learn from the experience.
My hearfelt gratitude for the chance to undertake this study and through this, the opportunity of participating in the Calgary IPRA conference.”

Bing (Ofelia Durante)
MUSLIM-CHRISTIAN DIALOGUE: A CASE STUDY OF TWO COMMUNITIES IN ZAMBOANGO CITY, MINDINAO, PHILIPPINES

 

“I am very grateful to the IPRA Foundation for contributing to our Creative Response to Bullying Program in the United States. We were able to see linkages between bias and bullying behavior and show a decrease in detention rates when students and staff received CRC’s bullying prevention workshops.”

Priscilla Prutzman, Executive Director
Creative Response to Conflict
Nyack, New York, USA
PROGRAM EVALUATION: CREATIVE RESPONSES TO BULLYING AND BIAS

 

“Our grant from the IPRA Foundation allowed us to maintain a collaborative action-research project on community radio, democratization and peace in Palestine. Most of the funds were devoted to conducting and documenting a training program that was attended by some thirty youth and young professionals in Nablus. Even though the occupation and intra-communal conflict prevented our radio station from being launched, the knowledge generated and training made possible by this small grant have been invaluable in our community. Thanks to IPRA for supporting our unconventional research collaboration. It sustained us for many months of work.”

Cynthia Cohen, Brandeis University
Mohammad Sawalha, An-Najah Universisty
Palestinian House of Friendship, Nablus, Palestine
COMMUNITY RADIO, DEMOCRACY AND PEACE: AN ACTION RESEARCH COLLABORATION

“I found the small peace research grant very useful as it gives opportunities to peacemakers to invest energies towards expanding the field of the peace research, especially young peace researchers has a lot to benefit from such funding opportunities. It is too early for me to talk about the impact of my research under the IPRA Foundations’ Small Peace Research Grant, as my paper is yet to be published and I am hoping to present that next year in at least one of the international conferences.
My paper on “Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA): lessons from Pakistan” was presented at the panel on “Conflict resolution, reconstruction, and peace-building across Syria, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan” on 7th February 2009, as part of the World Conference of Humanitarian Studies-2009, in Groningen, The Netherlands. To be a part of this conference, I was among the very participants who were fully funded to present their groundbreaking research.
Currently, the paper is under review to be published in the next issue of the Peace & Conflict Review, a peer reviewed journal of the UN mandated University of Peace, Costa Rica.
I am indebted to IPRAF for supporting my research in Pakistan.”

Zahid Shahab Ahmed
PhD Scholar, University of New England, Australia
PEACE AND CONFLICT IMPACT ASSESSMENT (PICA): THE ANALYSIS OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT INTERVENTIONS IN PAKISTAN

 

“A list of the policy and journal publications that came from the IPRAF-supported research can be found here:http://chrisblattman.com/projects/sway/. In the end this became a very large project with many donors, but IPRAF was one of our first and gave us the seed funding to get it off the ground. It led to four years of work on youth well-being and post-war reintegration in northern Uganda. Thanks for the support and let me know if there’s anything more I can add.”

Chris Blattman
Assistant Professor of Political Science & Economics, Yale University
http://chrisblattman.com
STOLEN CHILDREN, SHATTERED LIVES? A PROPOSAL FOR THE CHILD SOLDIER TRACKING PROJECT (CSTP): A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF ABDUCTION, SOLDERING, AND REINTEGRATION ON THE CHILDREN OF SUDAN AND UGANDA

“The IPRA Foundation grant helped me turn my project into a reality. It allowed me to go and meet with investigative journalism trainers and journalists who were doing amazing work post-conflict in the Arab region. In turn, I was able to identify the challenges and opportunities facing Arab investigative journalists, in order to produce a set of recommendations to assist them towards their journey forwards in the pursuit of a democratic Arab sphere. The grant went towards the first stage of the project, which has already resulted in securing a book contract towards the publication of the findings of the study. I am grateful for IPRAF for providing me with this opportunity and for funding projects that need to be researched.”

Dr. Saba Bebawi
Lecturer Journalism, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design
Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
DEMOCRACY BUILDING IN POST CONFLICT REGIONS: INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM TRAINING POST ARAB SPRING

“I am eternally grateful for the generous support of the IPRA Foundation.  Without their support this research would not have been possible.  The IPRA Foundation offers a unique opportunity for an interdisciplinary group of researchers from all over the world to explore vital issues facing our world today.  I am honored to be part of such an inspiring group of researchers and practitioners.”

Emma Swan
Director, Women and Peace Program
International Women’s Rights Project, Victoria, Canada
AN EXPLORATION INTO THE GENDERED INTERPRETATION OF SUMMUD AND ITS SUBSEQUENT MANIFESTATIONS IN PALESTINIAN PEACEBUILDING: TOWARDS A GENDER INCLUSIVE MODEL OF PEACEBUILDING

“Much appreciation and gratitude to the IPRA Foundation for supporting research focused on understanding the direct role that religion plays in conflict and peace through the town of Malerkotla in India. Through ethnographic fieldwork I was able to explore the overall pattern of Sikh-Muslim interactions in a town that can transcend conflict and make peace the norm. Since the grant, the work has been published as a book Civil Society in Malerkotla, Punjab: Fostering Resilience through Religion and has been used in practice-based work in promoting inter religious understanding, cross-cultural awareness and conflict transformation.”

Karenjot Bhangoo Randhawa, Canada
Lecturer, Peace and Conflict Studies
University of California, Berkeley, USA
HOW DOES RELIGIOUS CONFLICT SHAPE THE VIEWS OF CONFLICT AND PEACEMAKING IN THE STATE OF PUNJAB?

“Thanks to IPRAF’s support, our team was able to complete fieldwork in Gaza and the West Bank that provided us with critical insight into the civil resistance strategies that underpinned the mass mobilization efforts of the First Intifada. This grant enabled us to capture perspectives from women from different geographic areas, class backgrounds, education levels and positions of leadership, ensuring that our research reflects the diversity of participation in the uprising. We are very grateful for IPRAF’s generosity, which has played a key role in the success of our project.”

Julia Bacha, Just Vision, USA
Impact Producer – The Wanted 18
Director & Producer Budrus & My Neighbourhood
Creative Director Just Vision
Speaker TED
RESEARCH PROJECT ON WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP IN HISTORIC NONVIOLENT MOVEMENT-BUILDING IN THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONTEXT

“We are very grateful to the IPRA foundation for the grant that enabled us to do research on how changing narratives about conflict can help reduce conflict and encourage peaceful resolution. We were able to conduct studies with Jewish and Palestinian Israelis, Americans, and Turkish Kurds in the context of different conflicts. This research would not have been possible without the generous support from the IPRA Foundation. Most importantly, consistent results indicate that putting forward new narratives about conflicts can help play a critical role in reducing conflict and encouraging peaceful conflict resolution. ”

Dr. Bernhard Leidner, Germany, and Levi Adelman, USA
Asst Professor, Psychology of Peace and Violence Program
Department of Psychology
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
UNDERSTANDING AND ALLEVIATING COMPETITIVE VICTIMHOOD TO PROMOTE INTERGROUP CONFLICT RESOLUTION: A FIELD-EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF CAUSES OF COMPETITIVE VICTIMHOOD AND AN INTERVENTION TO COUNTER IT

“Thanks to the early support of the IPRA Foundation, I and my partner organizations in Zimbabwe were able to develop and test a methodology to collect information on the sensitive topic of political risk in Zimbabwe. Without this support, it would have been impossible for us to ultimately attract larger sources of funding to collect information from 1,200 respondents in a large-scale survey of opposition supporters in urban and rural areas. Our research delves into the micro-mechanisms of how citizens in an autocratic regime decide to express support for democracy to show that the emotions of anger and fear shape how citizens perceive and process information about political risk. These micro-level mechanisms also scale up into meaningful variation in who takes pro-democracy action and who stays home in a repressive environment. We look forward to continuing to work with the IPRA network as we move forward with this research agenda! ”

Lauren E. Young, USA
Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science
Columbia University, New York, USA
PROMISES AND PAIN: THE USE OF PATRONAGE AND COERCION TO WIN ELECTIONS

“My research on gendering peace process in Kashmir could only have been made possible due to the IPRA Foundation grant. The grant helped me to conduct field research in Kashmir and collect relevant data. The research offered insights on how discourses on conflict and peace in a protracted conflict situation are shaped by patriarchal social order and how both men and women reinforce that social order. The findings of the research would be relevant for theories of gender, conflict and peace and their intersections and for policy making towards making peace process gender sensitive.”

Seema Shekahawat, Ph.D., Univ. of Jammu, India
Independent Researcher, Social Scientist
Jaipur, India
PEACE PROCESS IN KASHMIR: WHERE ARE WOMEN?

“I am grateful to the IPRA Foundation for providing me with a small grant to complete my study. The grant enabled me to undertake interviews with many stakeholders and to convene Focus Groups that were essential to the completion of the study. It was of great value that the study includes representatives of all actors in the Zimbabwe’s governance. The grant enabled victims of the lack of governance in the country to have their views taken into account, especially in the analysis of many events in Zimbabwe’s history. They were also able to participate with other stakeholders in making recommendations on how good governance and peace should be established within the framework of the new Zimbabwe’s Constitution of 2013. The IPRA Foundation’s support is therefore greatly appreciated.”

Leonard T. Kapungu, Ph.D., Director of Research, Documentation and Training at the General Emmanuel Erskine Research and Documentation Centre
Mutare, Zimbabwe
THE SEARCH FOR PEACE: THE PROMOTION OF GOOD GOVERNANCE IN ZIMBABWE

“The IPRA Foundation’s generous financial support helped me realize the most crucial element of my research project: the fieldwork component. Carrying out such a research project in remote locations in Colombia is by no means an easy feat, logistically or financially, however with the funds provided from this grant, I was able to conduct all the necessary archival and ethnographic research necessary in various locations throughout this South American country without problem. Furthermore, the research findings which this grant helped produce have become the basis for a much larger research project with an expanded focus throughout numerous highly contested regions in rural Colombia. I owe the IPRA Foundation my sincerest gratitude for helping me with this endeavor.”

Charles Larratt-Smith, Ph.D., Political Science, University of Toronto, Canada
ECHAR LENA AL FUEGO: SEMI-GOVERNED SPACES AND THE PROLIFERATION OF VIOLENCE IN COLOMBIA

“I applied for the IPRA Foundation grant never thinking I would be a recipient, but it came through. And better still, I was offered the full sum of $5,000 which was above my original quote. While I had planned a trip to Addis Ababa for my field research, the Foundation’s generosity afforded me the opportunity of a trip to Nigeria for my research as well. Getting by in Addis Ababa and movement within Nigeria where I had to travel long distances for interviews was not easy, but IPRAF’s research grant was vital to my succeeding. Some part of it also augmented my fees. The Foundation’s gesture helped my dream for a PhD anI hope the impact of my research will justify this assistance. I am deeply grateful.”

Jude Cocodia, Ph.D., School of Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham, UK
THE AFRICAN UNION AS PEACEKEEPER: AN EVALUATION ON EFFECTIVE PEACEKEEPING

“The money I received from the IPRA Foundation helped me get a larger fieldwork project off the ground in Rwanda. The results from this fieldwork are now an integral part of my PhD dissertation. I am sincerely grateful to IPRAF for providing the initial seed funding to start this research. Without your initial support, I would not have been able to find further donors.”

Leander Heldring, Ph.D., Economics, Oxford University, UK
STATE CAPACITY AND INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES: EVIDENCE FROM RWANDA

“As a Cypriot, the Cyprus conflict has been a part of both my daily and professional life. My decision to embark upon a PhD, where I would focus Cypriot identities and perceptions of security, was a very personal one. The IPRA Foundation grant did not only help me deepen and enrich my PhD fieldwork with extensive use of mixed-methods, it also helped me unpack and get to know my own Cypriotness better. I hope my research findings and future publications will inform policy-making and peacebuilding efforts in Cyprus, and with more comparative analysis, they may be able to facilitate efforts in other conflict environments as well. In addition to financial help that was truly instrumental for the success of my research, it was an absolute pleasure to work with and receive the support of IPRA Foundation throughout the process.”

Ilke Dagli, Ph.D. candidate, Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick, UK, Cyprus and UK
SECURITISATION OF ETHNIC COMMUNITIES IN CONFLICT ENVIRONMENTS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR PEACE-BUILDING: THE CASE OF CYPRUS

“Sincere thanks to the International Peace Research Association Foundation for the funding support that was instrumental in the completion of my research! This grant helped me reach members from two highly understudied minorities – Dalits (so-called lower castes) and Muslims – in the under-researched context of India, and contribute to the scarce research on minority-minority relations from a much-needed intersectional perspective.”

Rashmi Nair, Ph.D, Social Psychology, Clark University, MA, USA, Teaching Assistant, Clark University
PEACE AND CONFLICT BETWEEN MINORITIES: UNDERSTANDING DALIT-MUSLIM RELATIONS IN INDIA

“The IPRAF Peace Research Grant allowed me to continue research started as part of my dissertation and further my collaboration with Sadaka Reut. With the grant funds I was able to travel to Israel during the summers of 2015 and 2016 to meet with organization staff and former participants, attend strategic planning and facilitation training meetings, in order to better understand the mechanisms that have enabled Sadaka Reut to inspire its participants to continue working towards positive social change in the Israeli context. I am grateful for this support.”

Karen Ross, Ph.D, Education Policy Studies, Indiana University, School of Education IN, USA, Assistant Professor of Conflict Resolution, UMASS Boston, Senior Fellow, Center for Peace, Democracy and Development, UMASS Boston
UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS OF SOCIAL CHANGE EMPOWERMENT: FROM ENCOUNTER PARTICIPATION TO PEACE-BUILDING ACTIVISM