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Spring 2015 Newsletter

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

 

Dear Friend

Dr. Linda Johnston, President

I hope that 2015 will be a good year for promoting peace research in the world. The IPRA Foundation continues to fund research and scholars who will help promote peace. Please have a look at our website to see the growing list of all the projects and research we have supported in the past. We welcome four new Peace Research Grant recipients to this list. Please take time to look over their work.

We are able to do this work through the generosity of donors who believe in the importance of promoting peace. The selection process for Peace Research Grants and Senesh Fellows is always a difficult one and I know that members of the selection committee struggle when deciding which grant and fellowship applications to support. We are very proud of the scholars we have funded and keep track of their continued success. Scholars also keep us informed when they publish a new book or begin a new project.

Linda M. Johnston, President

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

 

Femke Avtalyon-Bakker

 

 

Femke Avtalyon-Bakker, of the Netherlands, was granted this award in January 2015 for her project titled “Liberal norms and support for war in comparative cross-regime perspective: evaluating the presence and influence of liberal norms.”

Is Democracy a reason for war or peace? When President Clinton said “Democracies do not attack each other”, he did not simply express an ideological conviction, nor did he discuss a merely academic theory in his State of the Union address of 1994. He referred to what has often been called ‘the closest thing political science has to an empirical law’, namely the empirical finding that democracies do not go to war with other democracies. This finding, also called the ‘democratic peace’, is often interpreted by American and other Western policy makers as a prescription to promote democracy around the globe, with or without force, in an attempt to ’cause’ peace. Historically, the democratic peace traces its pedigree from the Abbe de St-Pierre and Immanuel Kant through to President Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations and more recent influences on successive National Security Strategies of the United States since the 1990s. Also the European Security Strategy has taken this notion to heart: “The best protection for our security is a world of well-governed states. Spreading good governance, supporting social and political reform, … and protecting human rights are the best means of strengthening the international order”. Peacebuilding missions aim to create a liberal-democratic political culture in order to foster domestic and international peace. Paradoxically, the democratic peace is even invoked as a rationale for war, such as the Iraq war in 2003.

Thus, policymakers and the public believe that socializing people into liberal norms is what a democratizing country needs to transform into a peaceful society and a peaceful player in world politics. However, within the current literature on the democratic peace there is insufficient evidence to veritably support that belief. The body of empirical work into an explanation for the democratic peace has focused only on liberal-democracies, which has led to a lack of information about different regime-types. Moreover, the necessary comparison between liberal-democracies and other regime-types has not yet been made. Considering the policy influence of democratic peace theory, the neglecting of evidence from other political regimes is a cause for concern. My own preliminary fieldwork suggests that in contrast to earlier research, there is no support to the claim that liberal-democratic political culture explains peace between democracies. These preliminary findings thus show that careful comparison between individuals in different political systems is of great importance to test the influence of liberal norms as expected within democratic peace theory, as they indicate that more extensive empirical testing as suggested in this research proposal, is necessary and useful. Moreover, the preliminary results have real world implications, suggesting that the emphasis on changing political cultures in non-democratic contexts, while admirable for any number of reasons, is unlikely to promote international peace.
This research project aims to assess the relationship between liberal-democratic norms and public support for war within different political settings. There is a unique opportunity to investigate the presence of liberal norms within different regime-types, and study their possible influence on the public support to use interstate force. The systematic collection of empirical evidence concerning liberal norms, and their influence on support for the use of force of my project will fill the existing empirical gap and thus contribute to theoretical clarification and thereby add to the knowledge about conditions for peace.
About Femke Avtalyon-Bakker
Femke Avtalyon-Bakker is a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute of Political Science at Leiden University in the Netherlands. She holds a Research Masters (MPhil) in Political Science from Leiden University. She is the Internship Coordinator for MSc International Relations and Diplomacy and MSc Political Science.
Read more about Femke’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/femke-avtalyon-bakker/.
To contact Femke, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

 

 

Ilke Dagli

 

 

Ilke Dagli of Cyprus was granted this award in January, 2015, for her research project, titled“‘Securitisation of Ethnic Communities in Conflict Environments and its Implications for Peace-Building: The Case of Cyprus.

In Cyprus, politics and peace are an inescapable part of our daily lives and conversations. Unfortunately however, the failure to find a comprehensive settlement to the protracted conflict on the island has created peace fatigue among many Cypriots. In recognition of this and with a stubborn -and maybe naïve- passion about contributing to peace, I became involved in reconciliation efforts on the island when I was only 12 years old and have been working with bi-communal projects supported by various donors (e.g.EU UNDP, USAID, Anna Lindh Foundation) since 2006.
The Cyprus Problem, which can be traced back to 1950s, has attracted the attention of myriad international organisations and donors over the years. Although the literature on Turkish-Cypriot and Greek-Cypriot identities and contemporary Cypriot politics is very rich, the literature on the Turkish settlers/migrants and how they influence and are influenced by the conflict has remained considerably shallow, rarely going beyond a debate about their numbers. Despite that the issue of Turkish settlers/migrants and demographics has been a big part of the peace negotiations, consistently coming up as a red herring in discussions about governance, security, identity and citizenship, and their growing number is perceived as an existential threat to the distinct Cypriot identity; the conflict resolution literature has predominantly focused on reconciliation between Turkish-Cypriot and Greek-Cypriots and failed to include the Turkish settlers/migrants in their analysis.
This research project looks at how Turkish settlers/migrants influence the identity and security dynamics of Cypriots and their perceived role within the conflict, with the aim of informing peace-building efforts and policy making. Turkish settlers/migrants are chosen as the focus of the study because they are politically charged and are perceived to be “different” than other migrants in Cyprus due to their ties to Turkey and Turkey’s role in the conflict.

About Ilke Dagli

Ilke is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick in the UK.

Read more about the project at http://iprafoundation.org/ilke-dagli/.

To contact Ilke, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
Dr. Seema Shekhawat

Dr. Seema Shekhawat, of India, was granted this award in January 2015 for her project titled “Peace Process in Kashmir: Where are Women?.”

On 31 October, 2000, the United Nations Security Council unanimously approved the Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security for advancement of gender equality in all processes of peace building. Notwithstanding the UN resolution, women continue to remain under-represented or absent from formal peace building processes. Amidst fierce debate on women’s association with peace being rooted either in their nature or nurture, it is disturbing to note their near total absence from the formal peace processes globally. Isn’t it a dichotomy that women are considered peaceful but they are denied due space in negotiating formal peace? And, Kashmir is no exception. In this research I posit the question – Where is the locus of the women in the peace building process in Kashmir? The whole conflict and peace politics in the region is ‘confined to the domain of men and the women remain outside it.’ There is an array of questions that need to be addressed: why women are not included in the peace making? What are the obstacles in the process of their inclusion? What difference can they make in peace process in comparison to male peace makers? Finally, in what capacities can they be involved in making peace sustainable? I will probe these questions in the context of Kashmir. The probing is crucial since the silence has perpetuated the negligence of women; giving rise to the notion that the gender insensitive peace process is fait accompli.

About Dr. Seema Shekhawat
Seema Shekhawat is a social scientist with a Ph.D. on the Impact of Conflict and Displacement on Women. She has researched and taught at the Universities of Jammu and Mumbai, India.
Read more about Seema’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/seema-shekhawat/.
To contact Seema, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

 

 

Leander Heldring

 

 

Leander Heldring, of the Netherlands, was granted this award in January 2015 for his research project, titled “State Capacity and Individual Preferences: Evidence from Rwanda.”

Success of state policies such as raising taxes or maintaining peace is determined by formal enforcement as well as norms that prescribe that obeying the government is a good thing to do. Does a well-functioning government actively influence these norms? And are norms of obedience something we should desire?

A state that has enough capacity to uphold peace, provide public goods and protect property rights is seen as essential for the development process (World Bank, 2004). Indeed, the absence of a strong state is one of the main drivers of civil violence (Fearon & Laitin, 2003). It is therefore no coincidence that the UN places state legitimacy, the extent to which the state is obeyed in absence of formal enforcement, at the heart of their peace building efforts (UNSC, 2001). Indeed, legitimation of state authority is the “primary challenge facing peacebuilding efforts today” (Talentino, 2007, p. 167). The aim of my research is to statistically uncover the effect of a well-functioning state on preferences of people. Are people who live in a strong state more trusting, altruistic or obedient?

This study is aimed at collecting a dataset at the level of the individual, recording data on measures of trust, altruism and obedience towards the state and relating these to the strength of the local state as well as the intensity of the genocide. Obtaining this data allows for answering my main questions: does a well-functioning state causally affect attitudes/preferences?

An affirmative answer to the first question has several important implications. First, it shows that a strong state actually influences people’s preferences. Second, these results would be the first to show how an administrative phenomenon such as state capacity relates to responses at a personal level. This is an important missing link in work that, for instance, relates state capacity to tax rates or property rights security.

The research strategy revolves around collecting data on attitudes and preferences in villages located in administrative sectors that have a) different state capacity and b) different intensities of violence in the 1994 genocide.

About Leander Heldring

Leander is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham, UK.

Read more about the project at http://iprafoundation.org/leander-heldring/.

To contact Leander, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR PAST PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
Dr. Katherine Layton, Ph.D.
for publication of her book:
Chechens: Culture and Society

Katherine Layton, of the U.S.A., was granted this award in July, 2012 for her project titled “Chechens.”
Announcement of Book Publication: Layton, Katherine S. (2014). Chechens: Culture and Society. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Upon completion of her research document sponsored by IPRAF’s Small Peace Research Grant, Katherine S. Layton submitted a manuscript of the research to Palgrave Macmillan, culminating in the publication of her book, Chechens: Culture and Society (released December 2014).

Chechens: Culture and Society, is now widely available, and Layton has begun the process of contacting various Chechen administered websites, to inform of the publication and to invite discussion and dialogue. In addition, the author has constructed a Chechens Facebook page for the book with posts that include interesting extracts and examples of Chechen cultural norms, along with relevant current events.

Katherine S. Layton anticipates that Chechens: Culture and Society, will inform audiences of the complexity of the Russian-Chechen/Caucasus conflict, the diversity of Muslim cultures, and the struggles for peace and development that indigenous and transitional communities experience in our globalized world.

Chechens: Culture and Society is an ethnography that elaborates the lived experiences of Chechens, focusing primarily on relationships and socio-cultural norms within the context of the current conflict in the Chechen Republic. Drawing on ten years’ experience living and working with Chechens in the North Caucasus Republic of Ingushetia and Istanbul, Turkey, the author utilizes tales as data, incorporating direct observation and her own participation in Chechens’ lives. The book examines norms described in their ‘ideal’ form, as told by Chechens, but also norms as they are played out in real lives. At present, nearly one-third of the Chechen nation lives as refugees outside the homeland. This is a time of cultural exploration for Chechens, perhaps a revival, perhaps destruction. The book explores the socio-cultural structures involved in managing the Chechnan collective and also examines differences and conflicts within the collective, providing insight into the difficulties of maintaining cultural standards under difficult circumstances.

 

About Katherine S. Layton, Ph.D.

Katherine Layton, Ph.D., is currently an Adjunct Faculty member of Tallahassee Community College in Tallahassee, FL, U.S.A. She is an Instructor of Political Science.
Read more about Katherine’s book and project at http://iprafoundation.org/katherine-layton/.

To contact Katherine, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR PAST PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
ON COMPLETION OF HIS PROJECT
Dr. W. Timothy Austin, Ph.D.

 

W. Timothy Austin, of the U.S.A., was granted this award in November, 2012 for his project titled“Peacekeeping Models in a Terror-Prone Land: The Case of Northwestern Mindanao in the Southern Philippines.” A report of his research project follows.

In 1521 A.C.E., Ferdinand Magellan, a Catholic, along with a crew of 270 dropped anchor off the small island of Mactan in what is now the southern Philippines. After hard fought battles with natives, who happened to have already accepted the Islamic faith, Magellan was slain. Today, over 400 centuries later, the shrine to the Muslim warrior Lapu-Lapu who felled the Spanish captain is more majestic than that for Magellan himself. However, the Spanish aggressors eventually overcame the local tribes and claimed the entire 1,000 mile archipelago of over 7,000 islands for Spain. Today, after generations of Spanish dominion, and about fifty years of American rule, the Muslim-Christian relations on the large island of Mindanao in the southern Philippines remains unsteady and holds a reputation as a terror-prone land.

The IPRAF Small Grant program allowed me to spend part of the summer of 2013 to conduct ethnographic inquiry in the province of Lanao del Norte, about 150 miles south of the original Muslim-Christian battlefield on Mactan Island. Of concern was how the area was still considered a home for terrorists, of persons and groups determined to thwart government. Is there something about the geo-social structures of the Philippines-of being splintered into thousands of islands that is problematic, and that makes forging stable government in an ethnically diverse region difficult? How are locals adapting to life in what some refer to as an area of low-intensive warfare?

Three major conclusions surfaced. First, it appears that locals treat any fear of terrorism and any Muslim-Christian turmoil in the same way that they cope with natural disasters-of which there are many. Living side-by-side with volcanoes, earthquakes, and monsoons have become a fact of Philippine life, and so has life with periodic uprisings between Muslims and Christians. Second, it is true nonetheless that one can witness at the research site many ways to manage personal anxiety brought on by occasional natural disasters and/or terroristic events. Third, by the end of the summer research venture, local residents were grouped into dissimilar categories regarding how they responded to a fear of terrorism. Some became “organizational devotees” and joined the military or police. Others worked behind the scenes as “timid affiliates” by joining civil activities and societies where they could nonetheless safely discuss their views. Then there were the “lone crusaders” who remained in their homes sometimes to clip news items to hand out to visitors, including to the researcher. Finally there were the “habitués” who became so accustomed or hardened to any on-going fear of terrorism that they blocked it out entirely, refusing to acknowledge it as a problem. This last group represents the dominate mode of adaptation. Besides, as locals would imply, if you do not see a problem, you are better able to harvest the rice.

About W. Timothy Austin, Ph.D.
W. Timothy Austin, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Read more about Timothy’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/timothy-austin/.

To contact Timothy, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR PAST PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
ON COMPLETION OF HER PROJECT
Dr. Maysa Siag

Maysa Siag, of Palestine., was granted this award in August, 2013 for her project titled “The Social Representations of the Self and Homeland shared by Palestinian Adolescents Born in Diaspora and Living in Refugee Camps.” A report of her research project follows.

The study was set out to explore and describe the social identity of 200 Adolescent Palestinian Refugees, living in Palestinian Refugee camps in Jordan, and attending the UNRWA schools and colleges which serves exclusively the Palestinian refugees. As an explorative study it was designed in 3 steps, aiming first at exploring the Adolescent Palestinian Refugees spontaneous self definitions and the representations adherent and produced by them, in addition to the emotions they associate with them. Second it aimed at exploring their social identity as a structure of organized meanings, checking how their identity elements and representations are situated in terms of acceptance and exposure; to define the hierarchy of their identity elements in relation to the most salient identity, accessible to their memory and evoked first. Also what are the elements that are widely shared and socially available. The third step sets out to investigate the salience of social identities -through a manipulation of layers of social identity- making one of the participants layers of social identities salient, to record the representational production and content for each layer of social identity (as either being a Palestinian, a Palestinian Refugee, a Young Person, an Arab, or a Muslim), and check if was different from those produced on the individual level -the spontaneous self definitions-. In addition, it aimed at investigating the structure and organization of the content and representations produced when one layer of social identity was salient. Finally, the third step aims at recording the change in emotions comparing the emotion descriptions and score for each layer of identity made salient and if different from the participants’ general states of emotion.

The main findings on adolescent Palestinian refugees were that the formation of a Palestinian social identity for the Palestinian adolescents living in Diaspora is a process interrupted, their Palestinian social identity is missing one of its contents: the land, and therefore their Palestinian social identity won’t be complete and achieved without their homeland. Nevertheless, they primarily define themselves as Palestinians.

The influence of the past violence suffered by the in-group was not evident in terms of narratives and images of war and violence, as the participants did not share such images or stories which might entail that the participants didn’t feel the need to remember, as if they were currently living in the ongoing act of violence. This could also be explained as a closure, the past violence is past and as young people they are living the present and aspiring the future.

The study found three motives for rejecting identities; the participants rejected identities that: (1) imply a threat for them, (2) describes the out-group, (3) related to negative identities they are labeled with.

The findings related to the manipulations making one layer of social identity salient for the participants did prove that the salience of one layer of social identity impacts the individual’s representational repertoire and is highly influenced by the group’s collective history. But that’s not all; it was also found that the broadness of the social identity plays a role in the produced content of the individual’s representational field as well as the security and stability of the social identity vs. the threatened identities. In addition to the findings concerning the saliency of a social identity and their structure it was proven that the firstly evoked content and how shared it is, changes according to the social identity layer made salient, showing that there are some sort of expectations, it terms of action, behaviour and emotions. Those findings implied that there is a general agreement between the participants and organized meanings for each of the social identities, where memory serves in providing first the most relevant contents.

About Dr. Maysa Siag
Dr. Maysa Siag is currently a Research Trainee at the European Doctorate on Social Representation and Communication at La Sapienza, University of Rome. Read more about Maysa’s project athttp://iprafoundation.org/maysa-siag/.
To contact Maysa, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR PAST PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
ON COMPLETION OF HER PROJECT
Dr. Saba Bebawi

 

Saba Bebawi, of Australia, was granted this award in September, 2013 for her project titled“Democracy Building in Post Conflict Regions: Investigative Journalism Training Post ‘Arab Spring’.” A report of her research project follows.

This project assesses the extent to which investigative journalism training for Arab journalists can be regarded as a knowledge and, in turn, a democracy building tool within the Arab world post the ‘Arab Spring’ protests. Specifically, this project focuses on how investigative journalism training and practice can be developed to provide in-depth news reporting in order to foster a democratic and transparent environment, which could lead to a sustainable and peaceful existence in post Arab Spring regions. Through interviews with Arab investigative reporting trainers, supervisors and journalists, this project uncovers the issues, challenges, and opportunities facing investigative journalism training in the Arab world.

This project, therefore, offers a clear perspective on the conditions, limitations and opportunities for investigative journalism training and practice in the Arab world, thus allowing for a better understanding of the extent to which such practice could play a role in democracy building and social empowerment. It discusses investigative journalism for print, radio, television and online platforms.

This study provides a set of policy recommendations on the state of investigative journalism training in the Arab region based on uncovering the limitations and opportunities investigative reporting is currently undergoing. These recommendations present a clear direction on what needs to be achieved or improved in order to allow investigative journalism to become a knowledge-building tool and a form of social empowerment, especially when the public is dependent on the media in post conflict times to reach a state of peace and development. Accordingly, this research project explores the extent to which investigative journalism training and practice for Arab journalists can be regarded as a knowledge and, in turn, a democracy building tool within the Arab world.

This project is divided into three stages, of which the IPRA Foundation grant provides funding for the first stage. This stage seeks to interview trainers and journalists at the Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism (ARIJ) as the nuclear training organization in the Arab world.

About Dr. Saba Bebawi
Saba Bebawi, Ph.D., is a journalism and media researcher with research interests in the role of media in democracy-building and media power. She is currently an Assistant Professor in Journalism at Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia. Read more about Saba’s project at
http://iprafoundation.org/saba-bebawi/.

To contact Saba, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

To Learn More About Us
Visit our website at www.iprafoundation.org
In This Issue

Support the IPRA Foundation

 

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before. Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Or

send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:

IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #289
Superior, CO 80027
treasurer(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.

The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

Now Accepting Applications for the Peace Research Grants Program

 

The Peace Research Grant Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for outstanding proposals. The IPRA Foundation accepts applications for the The Peace Research Grant Program on a rolling basis.

The Peace Research Grant Application and Instructions may be found at http://iprafoundation.org/peace-research-grants-instructions/

UPCOMING IPRA
AFFILIATE REGIONAL
CONFERENCES –
CALLS FOR PAPERS

The following five IPRA regional affiliates announce Calls For Papers for their conferences. Visit their individual websites for the Call For Papers information and Registration Forms.

 

AFPREA 2015 Conference, Abuja, Nigeria
April 13-15, 2015
Conference theme: “The Quest for Peace and Security in Africa: Socio-cultural, Economic, political and Legal Considerations”
http://afprea.org/EUPRA 2015 Conference, Tromsø, Norway
September 2-4, 2015
Conference theme: “The Framing of Europe: Peace Perspectives on Europe’s Future”
http://euprapeace.orgAPPRA 2015 Conference, Kathmandu, Nepal
October 9-11, 2015
Conference theme: “Pathways towards Just Peace: Reinventing security, justice and democracy in Asia-Pacific”
http://appra.net/appra-conference-2015/CLAIP 2015 Conference, Guatemala City
October 26-28, 2015
Conference theme:
“Latin America seeking the path towards a Sustainable Peace. Tools and Contributions” Contact: Maria Eugenia Villarrealvilareal.maria@gmail.com

 

PJSA 2015 Conference, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA October 15-17, 2015
Conference theme: “Cultivating the Just and Peaceable Self: Understanding Transformation and Transforming Understanding in Research and Practice”
http://peacejusticestudies.org/

Contact Us
Dr. Linda M. Johnston, President
IPRA Foundation

president(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

This Newsletter is brought to you by the IPRA Foundation IPRAFoundation.org

Copyright © 2015. All Rights Reserved.

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear Friend

Dr. Linda Johnston, President

We would like to dedicate this issue of the newsletter to one of those people who have given so much to the success of the IPRA Foundation.  We particularly want to remember the many years that our colleague and friend, Chad Alger, served as the Vice-President of the IPRA Foundation as well as the Secretary General of IPRA.  We all miss his wise counsel and expertise.

Please keep the IPRA Foundation in your giving plans this holiday season. You can make a contribution directly from this Newsletter (see the “Support the IPRA Foundation sidebar.) We use all the donations we receive to fund Peace Research Grants and the Senesh Fellowship. Please have a look at our website to see the growing list of all the projects and research we have funded.

This year, for the first time, we awarded two Senesh Fellowships. Members of the IPRA Foundation Board were able to meet one of the scholars in person, as Lydia Wanja Gitau from Kenya, was able to attend the recent IPRA Conference in Istanbul, Turkey. We are very proud of the work she is doing.Our other scholar also from Kenya, Mary Thamari Odhiambo, is proceeding well with the work on her Ph.D. program. We hope to meet her in person at a future time.

When we look at the wonderful work our scholars have produced, we can all be proud that we had a hand in helping them achieve their goals. When you have a minute, look at the impressive list of Fellows and their work: http://iprafoundation.org/senesh-fellowship/.

 

Our Peace Research Grants program has been very active this year. We have awarded four Peace Research Grants and are very excited about the work these scholars are doing to promote peace in the world. As our program grows in both the number of applicants and in the scope of work our scholars are doing in the field, we are faced with a “wonderful” problem. We receive a lot of grant applications and try to fund as many worthy applicants as we can. Our review team works hard to bring forward the excellent research currently being done.

 

 

Linda M. Johnston, President

 

IN MEMORIAM:
CHADWICK FAIRFAX ALGER 1924-2014

Vice President, International Peace Research
      Association Foundation (IPRAF) Board

 

      of Directors 2008-2014
President, International Studies Association (ISA)
      1978-1979

 

Secretary General, International Peace Research
Association (IPRA) 1983-87

Chad Alger was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1924, and died in Columbus, Ohio, February 15, 2014.  He was one of the pioneers and “parents” of the field of peace research, and he has been honored for his career-long contribution to international relations scholarship.  He was a key figure in bridging an often wide gap between traditional international relations studies and the new ideas that became prevalent in the 1950’s and 1960’s.
 
Chad served in the WWII, and as a young man started to ask questions about why he and his generation had become involved in international conflict, and he became interested in working with the new organizations that were established at the end of the war to work with conflict in a more constructive way. He worked on the United Nations (UN) in the 1960’s by directly observing what went on in the General Assembly and elsewhere, focusing on who the movers and shakers were as well as who worked behind the scenes to see that the organization worked in spite of its many flaws.

Many individuals and organizations drew him further into the world of peace research.  Chad became an important part of the intellectual and institutional development of the field. He played a major role in the life of the International Peace Research Association and helped establish the Peace Studies Section of the International Studies Association. He made a unique contribution to peace and conflict studies with his work on the linkages that exist between local communities in distant ostensibly separate countries. His work on these foreign connections and thus the ‘foreign policies’ of cities was path breaking and pre-dated much of the interest in multi-track approaches to peacemaking by practitioners from the 1980’s onwards.

Chad joined the faculty of Ohio State University in 1971 as a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the Mershon Center for International Security Studies, where he continued to teach and write for over 40 years. He had a quick wit and loved keeping meetings light and making people laugh. He served on the Board of Directors of the IPRA Foundation since its inception, bringing his vast experience, wisdom and good humor to all its deliberations. He is very greatly missed by the Foundation and by the entire Peace Research community. Read more about Chadwick Alger at: http://iprafoundation.org/chadwick-alger/.

To contribute in his name please visit our website at

http://iprafoundation.org/make-a-contribution/

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW
SENESH FELLOW for 2014-2015

 

 

Lydia Wanja Gitau

 

 

Lydia Wanja Gitau, of Kerugoya, Kenya, is the 13th recipient of the Senesh Graduate Fellowship for 2014-2015.  She is currently a PhD student at the University of Sydney in Peace and Conflict Studies, specializing in trauma intervention for survivors of mass violence.

 

Lydia has a Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Kenyatta University, Kenya, 1987-1990, a Master of Arts Degree in Counseling from NIST in Nairobi, Kenya, 1993-1995, a Diploma in Counseling Psychology from TEC Institute in Nairobi, Kenya, 2005-2006, and a Master of Arts Degree in International Relations from USIU in Nairobi, Kenya, 2008-2010.
 
Lydia’s doctoral research topic is “Trauma Interventions and Peacebuilding: A Case Study of South Sudanese Refugees in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya.”  In this she is examining the link between trauma healing and peacebuilding.  More broadly, she is interested in examining the post-conflict interventions that have potential to support long-lasting peace in the East Africa Region.
 

Upon completion of her doctoral degree, Lydia plans to be a practitioner in the area of peacebuilding in terms of offering psychosocial support for survivors of conflict, and teaching and training in peace and conflict issues.  She plans to extend her counseling skills to the context of trauma healing and recovery after mass violence.  She also plans to be involved in ongoing research to expand knowledge and help develop interventions that are conflict-sensitive, trauma-related and culturally-relevant to the conflict situations in the East Africa region.  She is particularly interested in exploring the subject of forgiveness and reconciliation after mass violence, and its practical application in specific conflict situations.

Read more about Lydia at http://iprafoundation.org/lydia-wanja-gitau/.

To contact Lydia Wanja Gitau, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW
SENESH FELLOW for 2014-2015
Mary Thamari Odhiambo

Mary Thamari Odhiambo, of Nairobi, Kenya, is the 14th recipient of the Senesh Graduate Fellowship for 2014-2015.  She is currently a PhD student at the University of Birmingham in Africa Studies and Anthropology, Gender, Culture and Development. 

 

Mary has a Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Maseno University, Kenya, 1997-2001, and a Master of Arts Degree from Africa International University in Kenya. Her impressive employment history includes such projects as the Global Bag Project, County Girls Caucus where she is a founding director of a leadership and life skills development project for teenage girls in rural Kenya, and Africa by Design where she was able to organize a partnership between North American and Kenyan women for volunteer opportunities.

Originally from Kenya, Mary’s studies focus on gender issues in Kenyan marriage customs and their effects on community development in regard to women’s quest for socioeconomic growth. Through applied ethnographic research methods, she plans to study widow-inheritance and polygamy customs among the Luo of western Kenya. She will also research how these customs influence women’s fight against poverty. Her research will focus on aspects of culture and social dynamic that render women as more vulnerable members of households, especially in a context such as western Kenya, which has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence in the country. While recognizing that community development requires efforts of both women and men, her research will explore links between gender relations in marriage contexts, as well as wider community peace-building efforts, and how it all influences overall community development.

After completion of her doctoral studies, Mary plans to widen her involvement through local governance as well as lecture at a university in Kenya where she plans to engage students on matters of development, including peace-building as a component of community development, and gender in the context of local customs.

Read more about Mary at http://iprafoundation.org/mary-odhiambo/.

To contact Mary Thamari Odhiambo, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

 

 

Jogendro Singh Kshetrimayum

 

 

Jogendro Singh Kshetrimayum of India was granted this award inDecember, 2013, for his research project, titled “‘Collective Concern for Violent Death and Non-Violent Protest in the Midst of Armed Conflict in Manipur, Northeastern India.

The research seeks to understand the collective concern for violent death in the midst of the ‘undeclared war’ in Northeastern India, which is perhaps the longest ongoing armed conflict in South Asia.  Manipur, one of the states in the region, is deeply affected by the prolonged confrontation between the armed forces of the Indian state and the various separatist groups operating in the region. The region has seen intense militarization.
Certain forms of death, including death during childbirth, death by drowning, or death by any other unusual accident, are considered ‘violent’ or ‘abnormal’ in many parts of the world such that special funeral rites are performed for them. But what happens to the performance of the special funeral rites when crisis is the norm, as happens in cases of war, armed conflicts of long duration, epidemics, natural disasters, etc.? Can the challenges posed to the normative funeral practices trigger social responses that have practical implications for resolving the ongoing crisis? These are some of the larger questions this project seeks to explore and understand in the context of the ongoing armed conflict in Manipur, India.

 About Jogendro Singh Kshetrimayum

Jogendro is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin.

Read more about the project at http://iprafoundation.org/jogendro-singh-kshetrimayum/.

To contact Jogendro, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT 
Emma Swan

Emma Swan, of Canada, was granted this award in June 2014 for her project titled “An Exploration into the Gendered Interpretation of Summud and Its Subsequest Manifestations in Palestinian Peacebuilding: Towards a Gender Inclusine Model of Peacebuilding.”
From a human security perspective, it is imperative to understand and place the individual, thus the local, at the centre of analysis.In appreciation of this, through an endeavor to explore gender and peacebuilding in Palestine, this research will incorporate and investigate the uniquely Palestinian concept of sumud. By including the interaction between the concept of sumud and gender in the study of peacebuilding in Palestine this study honors unique situational and cultural contexts.
Current literature on peacebuilding confirms increasing recognition of the ways in which experiences of conflict differ for women and men. Furthermore, it is well documented that women often face the most severe consequences during times of conflict and they are highly underrepresented in formal peacebuilding processes. As a result, there has been a dramatic increase in attention to the inclusion of women in these processes. This is often framed as ‘engendering peacebuilding’. However, to date, concepts of engendering peacebuilding, gender analysis, and gender mainstreaming most often equate the term gender with women. The treatment of gender as woman has led to a focus on the experiences, importance, and value of including women in peacebuilding. Although recognition of women’s agency in peacebuilding is crucial to success, there needs to be a complementing and equally in-depth exploration of men’s unique role in the same domain.
The intent of this study, then, is to analyze the gendered interpretation and manifestation of sumud and explore how gendered interpretation helps to better understand dynamics that influence Palestinian peacebuilding. Additionally, this research aims to explore the construction and assumptions of gender identities as they relate and contribute to peacebuilding in Palestine.
Emma Swan has completed her project and has submitted her excellent Final Report.
About Emma Swan
Emma Swan is currently the Director of the Women and Peace Program at the International Women’s Rights Project in Victoria, BC, Canada.
Read more about Emma’s project, including her final report, at  http://iprafoundation.org/emma-swan/.
To contact Emma, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

 

 

Jude Cocodia

 

 

Jude Cocodia, of Nigeria, was granted this award in July 2014 for his research project, titled “‘The African Union as Peacekeeper: An Evaluation on Effective Peacekeeping.”

 

Peacekeeping has often been used to prevent conflict from degenerating further and the African Union, since its inception has been in the thick of this exercise. Providing security on a continent where conflict abounds and where belligerents are often non-state amorphous groups and the formal rules of engagement often do not apply is no easy task. This proliferation of nasty little wars which has characterized the post cold war era has often necessitated a robust approach to peacekeeping.
This project is a case study qualitative research which examines what peacekeeping requires to succeed and how the African Union has been able/unable to adapt to the role of the continent’s peacekeeper. The African Union serving as case study is influenced by the fact that it has the unenviable task of overseeing a region fraught with conflict, and of which to foster development on the African continent and improve the quality of life, the effective management of conflict is a foremost objective.
 

The official documents sourced from the UN would mainly be reports on the framework for peacekeeping, peacekeeping mandates, peacekeeping operations and resolutions of the UN Security Council and the General Assembly obtained from its website. Since the AU often seeks the permission of the UN to undertake peacekeeping missions, documents sourced from the AU would focus more on the reports of peacekeeping operations. Recourse would also be made to the AU online and real-time archives.

For a study of this magnitude and to further facilitate the results of this research, semi-structured interviews would be conducted with officials of the African Union Peace and Security Council at the AU headquarters in Addis-Ababa. Through these officials, links would be made with peacekeeping field operatives. Achieving this would help provide a balanced view of both the political/bureaucratic and field/military dimensions of AU peacekeeping.

 About Jude Cocodia

Jude Cocodia is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham, UK.

Read more about the project at http://iprafoundation.org/jude-cocodia/.

To contact Jude, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
Julia Bacha

Julia Bacha, of the U.S.A., was granted this award in July, 2014 for her project titled “Research Project on Women’s Leadership in Historic Nonviolent Movement-Building in the Israeli-Palestinian Context.”
About Julia Bacha
Julia Bacha is a Peabody award-winning filmmaker, media strategist, and the Creative Director at Just Vision, a non-profit in Washington, D.C. Julia started her filmmaking career in Cairo, where she wrote and edited Control Room (2004), for which she was nominated to the Writer’s Guild of America Award. Subsequently, she moved to Jerusalem where she co-directed Encounter Point (2006), and directed and produced Budrus (2009) and My Neighbourhood (2012). Her work has been exhibited at the Sundance, Berlin and Tribeca Film Festivals, broadcast on the BBC, HBO and Al Jazeera, and profiled in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Times and The Economist. In addition to over thirty film festival awards, Julia is the recipient of the King Hussein Leadership Prize, the Ridenhour Prize and the PUMA Creative Impact Award. She’s a Term Member at the Council on Foreign Relations, a Young Global Leader at the World Economic Forum, and a TED speaker.
Just Vision highlights the power and potential of Palestinians and Israelis working to end the occupation and build a future of freedom, dignity, equality and human security for all using nonviolent means. We tell their under-documented stories through our award-winning films, multimedia tools and targeted public education campaigns that undermine stereotypes, inspire commitment and galvanize action. Our overarching goal is to contribute to fostering peace and an end to the occupation by rendering Palestinian and Israeli grassroots leaders more visible, valued and effective in their efforts.
Read more about Julia’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/julia-bacha/.
To contact Julia, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
 Lauren Young

 

Lauren Young, of the U.S.A., was granted this award in July 2014 for her project titled “Promises and Pain: The Use of Patronage and Coercion to Win Elections.”

Why do citizens engage with the institutions of the state when the personal costs can be high and the benefits uncertain? What strategies can the state use to incentivize participation? Under what conditions is a positive rather than negative inducement more powerful in motivating participation? This project explores the determinants of public participation in government in the case of Zimbabwe using a unique mix of original and existing data sources from remote sensing, surveys, and participatory methods. The main outputs of this project are twofold: first, a theoretical study of the relationship between environmental factors and public participation; and second, a methodological study comparing the validity of different methods of measuring participation in Zimbabwe.

Popular participation in collective efforts has long puzzled social scientists. One possible answer for why people participate in collective efforts to engage with the state is that the state provides inducements to individuals or small groups to internalize the collective costs and benefits. A key hypothesis of this project is that economic inducements such as access to state support for agriculture or nutritional supplements will be more effective in inducing participation at lower levels of economic security.

The methodology in this research combines both qualitative and quantitative methods with a focus on proving and tracing causal relationships. Proving that changes in economic security cause shifts in the effectiveness and mix of strategies used by the state requires the identification of a source of exogenous variation in the independent variable. This project uses deviations of rainfall from historical averages and shifts in the global prices of commodities produced in specific parts of Zimbabwe to identify the causal effect of shifts in economic security on participation. It then uses qualitative methods to trace the causal processes underlying the observed relationships.

The fieldwork for this research will be conducted in the fall of 2014 in Zimbabwe.

About Lauren Young

Lauren Young is currently engaged with her PhD in Political Science at Columbia University. She has studied collective action and engagement with the state and state-like institutions in countries around the world, including Liberia, Hungary, and Haiti. She also works in analysis and evaluation of humanitarian interventions with international organizations including the U.N. Office for the Coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs, International Rescue Committee, and U.N. Population Fund.

Read more about Lauren’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/lauren-young/.
To contact Lauren, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact.

To Learn More About Us
Visit our website at www.iprafoundation.org
In This Issue

Support the IPRA Foundation

 

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Or

send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:

IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #289
Superior, CO  80027
treasurer(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

 A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.

The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

Now Accepting Applications for the Peace Research Grants Program

 

The Peace Research Grant Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for outstanding proposals. The IPRA Foundation accepts applications for the The Peace Research Grant Program on a rolling basis. 

  

More information about the Senesh Fellowship may be found at http://iprafoundation.org/peace-research-grants/ 

 

The Peace Research Grant Application and Instructions may be found at http://iprafoundation.org/peace-research-grants-instructions/

 

PEACE RESEARCH
GRANT RECIPIENTS’
FINAL REPORTS

Six of the IPRA Foundation’s Peace Research Grant recipients have submitted the Final Reports on their projects. Each final report may be found at the bottom of their webpages on our website as pdfs.. These Final Reports represent stellar research by top peace researchers. Please take a few moments to read this cutting-edge research.

 

Katherine Layton
Chechens”

 

W. Timothy Austin

“Peacekeeping Models in a Terror-Prone Land: The Case of Northwestern Mindanao in the Southern Philippines”

Raul de la Sierra Sanchez “Bandits or States? Evidence on Armed Groups’ Motives to Attack or Protect Civilians from Eastern Congo”

Dr. Maysa Siag “The Social Representations of the Self and Homeland shared by Palestinian Adolescents Born in Diaspora and Living in Refugee Camps”

Saba Bebawi

 “Democracy-Building in Post-Conflict Regions: Investigative Journalism Training Post-‘Arab Spring'”

  Emma Swan “An Exploration into the Gendered Interpretation of Summud and Its Subsequest Manifestations in Palestinian Peacebuilding: Towards a Gender Inclusine Model of Peacebuilding”

FIRST IPRA FOUNDATION PLENARY AT IPRA CONFERENCE
.

 

The IPRA Foundation hosted its first ever Plenary at the August, 2014 IPRA Conference, featuring four stellar presentations from one of our past Senesh Fellows and three of our past Peace Research Grantees.  Linda Johnston, IPRAF President, presented the plenary, which featured:

Isioma Kemakolam, of Nigeria, a Senesh Fellow from 2010-2011 attended Coventry University in Coventry, UK for a Masters Degree in Peace and Reconciliatory Studies.  Her thesis topic was “Building the Capacity of Traditional Institutions for Enhanced Participation of Women in Peacekeeping”.

Karenjot Bhangoo, of Canada, a Small Peace Research Grant recipient from 2004  “How Does Religious Conflict Shape the Views of Conflict and Peacemaking in the State of Punjab?”

 Zahid Shahab Ahmed, of Pakistan, a Small Peace Research Grant recipient from 2007  “Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA): The Analysis of International Development Interventions in Pakistan.”

 

Ayse Betül Çelik, of Turkey, a Small Peace Research Grant recipient from 2011 “Imagining Peace: Perceptions of Women Members of Parliament on the Kurdish Question in Turkey.” See her IPRA Conference presentation in Sage Publications here and on her webpage.

 

 

Contact Us
Dr. Linda M. Johnston, President
IPRA Foundation

president(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

This Newsletter is brought to you by the IPRA Foundation IPRAFoundation.org

Website header

December 2013 Newsletter
A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear Rachel

 

Dr. Linda Johnston, President

As we all mourn the passing of our colleagues and friends, Åke Bjerstedt and Christian Wellman, we are reminded also of the legacy they left and the number of young scholars they inspired. We are very grateful for the contributions to the IPRA Foundation given in Åke’s name. With these donations, we will be able to carry on the work of awarding grants for peace research.

Please keep the IPRA Foundation in your giving plans this holiday season. We use all the donations we receive to fund Peace Research Grants and the Senesh Fellowship. Please have a look at our website to see the growing list of all the projects and research we have funded.

We have just opened up the Senesh Fellowship applications for this coming year. I have worked on the Senesh Fellowship for seventeen years and I continue to be amazed by the promising young scholars who apply for the Fellowship. Their work will drive the peace field for the next generation. This year, for the first time, we will be awarding two Fellowships. We are able to do this through the generosity of donors who believe in the importance of this work. The selection process is always a difficult one and I am sure that each member of the selection committee wishes we could fund every application they review. When we look at the wonderful work our scholars have produced, we can all be proud that we had a hand in helping them achieve their goals. When you have a minute, look at the impressive list of Fellows and their work:  http://iprafoundation.org/senesh-fellowship/.

Rachel Trueblood, our Treasurer and website guru, has been working with a team to update our IPRAF website.  We are very grateful for her dedication to this work. We have a new look, just in time for our IPRA’s 50th Anniversary!

Linda M. Johnston, President

IN MEMORIAM: 
ÅKE BJERSTEDT  1930-2013

PIONEER: A SWEDISH PROFESSOR IN PEDAGOGY DEDICATED TO PEACE EDUCATION

Emeritus professor, world citizen and peace researcher Åke Bjerstedt of Malmö, Sweden passed away in Malmö in September 2013.  He was appointed reader (docent) in psychology at Lund University in 1956 and professor of education at Malmö School of Education in 1962.

 

His life-long devotion to peace education was paired with exceptional productivity. In the 1950s Åke Bjerstedt conducted studies on the Children’s International Summer Villages as a path towards global solidarity and understanding. In 1963, he was there among the people in Washington when Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his speech, “I have a dream”. During the first part of the 1990s, Åke Bjerstedt was the coordinator of the IPRA Peace Education Commission. Even a few months before his passing, he strived to familiarize himself with new literature on peace education.

 

Åke Bjerstedt’s long and versatile work has left an important imprint. His most valuable and enduring gift permeated both his professional and personal life: his light, confident outlook on life and on the possibilities and potentials of human beings in togetherness. Read more about Åke Bjerstedt at: http://iprafoundation.org/ake-bjerstedt/.

 

At the request of his family, the IPRA Foundation is accepting contributions in the name of Åke Bjerstedt with which we will be able to carry on the work of awarding grants for peace research.  To contribute in his name or in the name of someone you would like to honor, please visit our website at http://iprafoundation.org/make-a-contribution/, select “Peace Research Grants” under the “Contribute to a Particular Project Now with Paypal” heading and email our Treasurer, Rachel Trueblood, at: treasurer(at)iprafoundation(dot)org to designate your gift in Ake’s name.

 

DR. CHRISTIAN WELLMAN

Dr. Christian Wellmann of Germany was a senior researcher at Kiel University in International Political Sociology and a board member of the European Peace Research Association. He earned his Ph.D degree in Political Science from the Free University in Berlin. He worked as a peace researcher at universities and research institutes in Berlin, Frankfurt and Kiel, Germany. Notably, he co-founded the Schleswig-Holstein Institute for Peace Research (SHIP), where he served as both Deputy Director and Research Co-ordinator. His research interests included conflict prevention, conflict and co-operation in the Baltic Sea Region and EU-Russia-relations.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
Dr. Maysa Siag

Dr. Maysa Siag of Palestine was granted this award in August 2013 for her research project, titled “‘Who Am I?  I Am From There” The Social Representations of the Self and Homeland shared by Palestinian Adolescents Born in Diaspora and Living in Refugee Camps.” 

The research links the fields of social identity theory and social representations theory in an exploration of the social identity and associated emotions of 200 adolescent Palestinian refugees born and living in living in seven different refugee camps in Jordan.
Based on previous research showing the participants’ multi-layered social identities, Dr. Siag decided to conduct a pilot study to explore the main layers of their social identity as defined by themselves, using the Twenty Statements Test, asking the participants to answer twenty times to the question “Who Am I?”, in order to extract the main layers of identity emerging from these participants’ spontaneous self-definitions.

Following this first inquiry, the research undertook two further inquiries:

  1. to understand the participants’ self-definitions and their contents both through the frequency of their occurrence and from their order of evocation; and
  2. to clarify the manipulation carried out through this study by making one layer of social identity salient to the participants and recording changes in both the content produced (including emotions) and the structure of that content

 A Little about Dr. Maysa Siag

Dr. Maysa Siag is currently a Research Trainee at the European Doctorate on Social Representation and Communication at La Sapienza, University of Rome.

 

Read more about the project at http://iprafoundation.org/maysa-siag/.

 

To contact Dr. Siag, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact with her.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT 
Raul Sanchez de la Sierra

Raul Sanchez de la Sierra, of Spain, was granted this award in August 2013 for his project titled “Bandits or States?  Evidence on Armed Groups’ Motives to Attack or Protect Civilians from Eastern Congo.”
 
The central question of the project is: Why do some states engage in violence against civilians while others protect their populations and provide public goods?
Raul will systematically collect data from 100 villages in eastern Congo to produce village-level data on armed groups’ presence, activity and strategies, relating this data to the presence of different mineral endowments present in these villages to assess why armed groups use different types of violence. The data collected will also answer questions about the organization of self-defense groups and the use of sexual violence during wars.
Based on the results from an already-completed pilot of this project in a first set of villages, the research can credibly produce historical village-level data on armed groups’ presence, activity, and strategies, as well as social and economic historical data. This data will then allow the use of statistical techniques to assess the causal relationships leading armed groups to exercise different types of violence or to use violence to provide security for the civilians and invest in legitimacy.
The analysis aims to clarify causes of violence against civilians and of peaceful uses of violence while also advancing existing knowledge on the origins of proto-state organizations that monopolize violence to protect civilians instead of against them. Finally, the wealth of the historical economic, political and social data collected will allow for a long-term research agenda potentially shedding light on many other questions.
About Raul Sanchez de la Sierra
Raul Sanchez de la Sierra is currently engaged with his PhD in Economics at Columbia University.
Read more about Raul’s project at http://iprafoundation.org/raul-sanchez-de-la-sierra/.
To contact Raul, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we would be happy to put you in contact with him.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE SEARCH GRANT RECIPIENTS
 William M. Adler and Jody Jenkins

William M. Adler and Jody Jenkins, of the USA, have been awarded the IPRA Foundation Peace Research Grant in August 2013 for their research film project “Sweet Home Costa Rica: a Story of War…and Peace.”

The project’s objective is to document the emigration of some 40 Alabama Quakers from the U.S. in response to the military build-up to the Korean War and their subsequent efforts to build a pacifist community anew in Costa Rica.

 

During the military and political build-up to the Korean War, five members of the Fairhope, Alabama Monthly Meeting of Friends went to prison for refusing to register for the draft. Shortly after being released from federal prison in late 1950, Marvin Rockwell and some 40 other Quakers from Fairhope – nine families in all – took a resounding stand: they left the US and immigrated to Costa Rica, finally settling in a remote and isolated cloud forest they named Monteverde, or Green Mountain. There they set about building a life of pacifism and community, establishing a Meeting House, a cooperative cheese factory, and a Friends School, all of which continue to flourish today.

 

Through interviews with the handful of surviving pioneers and their children, as well as with Costa Rican and American historians and political scientists, and through extensive use of archival photos, newsreels, letters, diaries, home movies, news clippings and court records, the research will chronicle the Alabama Quakers’ decision to emigrate and their efforts to build a pacifist community in Costa Rica.

 

The research project will culminate in a film that will frame their story in the context of both the American postwar peace movement as well as that of post-Civil War Costa Rica (which lasted for three months during 1948). It will examine the wartime and post-war pressures and influences at work in the US, including the ways in which words such as “patriotism” and “freedom” were used to intimidate and persecute pacifists. The research will also explore how Costa Rica came to embrace the Quaker testimony of peace, what that decision says about Costa Rica’s national culture, and how and whether its decision to abolish the army might be replicated elsewhere.

 

Learn more about William and Jody’s project at  http://iprafoundation.org/william-adler-jody-jenkins/.

 

To contact Mr. Jenkins or Mr. Adler, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will gladly put you in contact with them.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT 
Dr. Saba Bebawi

Dr. Saba Bebawi, of Australia, has been awarded the IPRA Foundation Peace Research Grant in August 2013 for her research project, “Democracy-Building in Post-Conflict Regions: Investigative Journalism Training Post-‘Arab Spring’.” This project aims to assess the extent to which investigative journalism training for Arab journalists can be regarded both as knowledge and as a democracy-building tool within the Arab world following the ‘Arab Spring’ protests. The project is focused on how investigative journalism training and practice can be developed to provide in-depth news reporting in order to foster a democratic and transparent environment, which could lead to a sustainable and peaceful existence. Through interviews with Arab investigative reporting trainers, supervisors and journalists, this project aims to uncover the issues, challenges, and opportunities facing investigative journalism training in the Arab world, and in turn produce a set of recommendations that would provide a framework for improving investigative journalism in Arab countries.

 

This project is divided into three stages, but the IPRA Foundation grant only provides funding for the first stage, which seeks to interview trainers and journalists at the Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism (ARIJ) as the nuclear training organization in the Arab world.

About Dr. Saba Bebawi
Dr. Bebawi is a journalism and media researcher with many years experience in researching, writing, and teaching in the fields of Arab media, journalism, global media, and media policy. She was a broadcaster/producer for Radio Jordan’s English service for four years, during which she also worked for CNN, World New Events (USA), and Dubai TV. In Australia, she was a journalist at 3ZZZ Melbourne Ethnic Community Radio, a consultant for SBS, and is a certified radio trainer. Dr. Bebawi wrote for local newspapers in Queensland while working for MPower media, Amnesty International Australia, and Rehame during the Sydney Olympics.

 

Read more about her project at   http://iprafoundation.org/saba-bebawi/.
To contact Dr. Bebawi, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will put you in contact with her.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE SEARCH GRANT RECIPIENTS
 Dr. Bernhard Leidner and Levi Adelman

Dr. Bernhard Leidner (pictured) and Levi Adelman were awarded a Peace Research Grant in April 2013. Their project,“Understanding and Alleviating Competitive Victimhood to Promote Intergroup Conflict Resolution:  A Field-Experimmental Investigation of Causes of Competitive Victimhood and Interventions to Counter It,” aims to provide a model that focuses on causes of competitive victimhood’s persistence and people’s resistance to acknowledging out-group suffering. They then derive from this model an intervention consisting of an identity-affirming news report to alleviate competitive victimhood and the obstacle it poses to peaceful conflict resolution.

Drawing on previous literature, Dr. Leidner and Mr. Adelman hypothesize that the prospect of acknowledging the adversary group’s equal or even greater suffering threatens social identity and security. Based on this, they further hypothesize that affirming people’s identity and their security needs can create space to acknowledge adversaries’ suffering by alleviating the perceived threat to identity and security, ultimately increasing support for nonviolent conflict resolution and reconciliation. Both the model and the intervention are rigorously tested in field experiments in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with samples of both Jewish Israelis and Palestinians.

About Dr. Leidner and Mr. Adelman
Bernhard Leidner completed his Ph.D. at the New School for Social Research, NY, USA and is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology in the Psychology of Peace and Violence Program at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
Levi Adelman is a doctoral candidate at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in Social Psychology.

To contact Dr. Leidner or Mr. Adelman, please send an email to info(at)iprafoundation(dot)org and we will put you in contact with them.

In This Issue
In Memoriam: Åke Bjerstedt
Congratulations to Dr. Maysa Siag
Congratulations to Raul Sanchez de la Sierra
Congratulations to William M. Adler and Jody Jenkins
Congratulations to Raul Sanchez de la Sierra
Congratulations to William M. Adler and Jody Jenkins
Learn More About Us
Don’t Forget! IPRA International Conference
Join Us – Contribute Today
Applications Open!
New publication – Peace Education
Hayek Fund Career Grants
New Centre for Peace in Pakistan

Don’t Forget!
  The next IPRA International Conference will be in Turkey onAugust 10-14, 2014.
 
Please take a look at IPRA’S
ALL NEW website:
Contact the Secretaries General
with all questions about the Conference: secretary-general(at)iprapeace(dot)org or ipra2014(at)iprapeace(dot)org.
Join Our Mailing List

Support the IPRA Foundation

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Or

send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:
IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #289
Superior, CO  80027
treasurer(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

 

A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.
The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

 

Now Accepting Applications for the Dorothy Marchus Senesh Fellowship

The Dorothy Marchus Senesh Fellowship provides two biennial fellowships awarded to two women from the developing world for studies in the field of peace. The IPRA Foundation is now accepting applications for the Fellowship.  Applications are due by

January 15, 2014.

An Announcement about the 2014-2015 Fellowship as well as the Application Form may be found at  http://iprafoundation.org/senesh-announce/

More information about the Senesh Fellowship may be found at http://iprafoundation.org/senesh-fellowship/

 

PEACE EDUCATION
Third Edition

by Ian M. Harris and Mary Lee Morrison

  

Peace Education, now in its third edition, provides a comprehensive approach to educating for a just and sustainable future. This book provides religious and historical trends that have molded our understanding of “peace.” Peace Education presents a variety of ways to practice peace education in schools and communities and explains how it can empower students.

The authors, Ian Harris and Mary Lee Morrison, with over sixty years of combined experience in teaching, consulting, writing, initiating and designing curricula in academic, school and community based settings, show readers the power of a transformative approach to education.

HAYEK FUND CAREER
GRANTS

IHS – INSTITUTE FOR HUMANE STUDIES

at George Mason University

The IHS Hayek Fund for Scholars awards grants on a rolling basis to aspiring academics pursuing liberty-advancing careers of up to $750 for students and untenured scholars.  Please see more at:

Hayek Fund Career Grants

INAUGURATION OF A CENTER FOR PEACE IN PAKISTAN
from Zahid Shabab Ahmed

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon inaugurated the International Center for Peace and Stability at NUST University in Islamabad August 13, 2013.

Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani welcomed the Secretary General at the University.

See more at:

Pakistan Peace Centre

Contact Us
Dr. Linda M. Johnston, President
IPRA Foundation

president(at)iprafoundation(dot)org

This Newsletter is brought to you by the IPRA Foundation IPRAFoundation.org
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Newsletters are published quarterly.

You can select your newsletter on the right vertical menu under the heading of “Recent Posts.”

From: IPRA Foundation <president@iprafoundation.org>
Subject: Spring 2013 IPRA Foundation Newsletter
Reply: president@iprafoundation.org
Website header

Spring 2013 Newsletter

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear Friend,
Dr. Linda Johnston, President The next IPRA conference will be in Turkey on August 10-14, 2014. We are planning a gathering of and presentation by Senesh Fellows and Peace Research Grant recipients. This will represent the first time we have gotten these scholars together to present the results of their outstanding research in the field.

We have hired another Development Director. We welcome Paul Donahue to our staff. He brings to us years of experience, as well as several areas of expertise which we need in order to move forward with the work of the Foundation. We are in the process of planning a visual presentation highlighting the work we and our scholars do in the field. Paul will have a key role in the development of that project. Of course, we will continue to seek contributions and will focus in the future on possible bequests from IPRA members.

We continue to receive many applications for our Peace Research Grants. It is always exciting to see the breadth and depth of the research in the field. We are different than most funding sources in the peace field, in that we will offer constructive critique of a proposal and then invite the scholar to resubmit the proposal for the next cycle. In this way, we distinguish ourselves from other funders and, at the same time, encourage the work of promising scholars in the field.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR, Paul Donahue

The InternatPaulDonahueional Peace Research Association Foundation is very excited to announce a new addition to its team, Paul Donahue. Paul brings to the board over a decade of experience in all areas of fundraising at museums, universities, health organizations and other non-profit organizations in the United States and Europe. In addition, Paul has experience in capital and endowment campaigns, as well as corporate, foundation, government and major gift fundraising. Paul is also a prize winning Filmmaker, Video Journalist, Camera-person and Editor with more than twelve years of video production/post-production experience.Paul Donahue will be leading our outreach and fundraising initiatives.

Paul’s duties and responsibilities include: (a) designing and implementing the annual and long-range fund development; (b) building strong relationships with donors, potential donors, professionals and community foundations in order to extend the base of giving and the recognition of International Peace Research Association Foundation; (c) writing grant proposals and reports to corporates and foundation funders; (d) maintaining offices records, systems, and funding database for tracking gifts, donors, and prospects; (e) developing and implementing individual donor campaigns, including major gifts, planned giving, and fundraising events; and (f) performing other duties and responsibilities as assigned by the President of the Board.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT
W. Timothy Austin, PhD.

Dr. W. TimotTimothyAustinhy Austin was granted this award for his ethno

graphic research project titled “Peacekeeping Models in a Terror-

Prone Land: The Case of Northwestern Mindanao in the Southern Philippines.”

In this project, he specifically explores three critical questions as follows:
  1. How is life in the conflict-ridden land of the research setting described in terms of interpersonal conflict?
  2. How are interpersonal problems and conflicts in the terror-prone land of the research setting depicted by local voices through case-studies?
  3. How have local citizens found ways to cope with life in this longtime terror-prone region?

To address these questions, Dr. Austin expects to use a traditional ethnographic approach that combines daily observations of small-town life with semi-structured and open-ended interviews with locals. He expects to interview about thirty informants including educators, lawyers, retired government workers, physicians, merchants, students, and local farmers in Mindanao where he will conduct his field work this summer 2013.

 

 A LITTLE ABOUT DR. W. TIMOTHY AUSTIN

 

Dr. Austin joined the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) Department of Criminology in 1984 after serving on the faculty at the University of Central Florida (previously Florida Technological  University), North Carolina State University, and Montana State University. His academic background is mixed with a BA in Anthropology, an MS  in Criminology, and Ph.D. in Sociology.

 

Beginning in the 1980s with two Senior Fulbright Research Awards, Dr. Austin enjoyed over a dozen research ventures to Southeast Asia. Over the years, he explored informal dispute resolution in Philippine villages, and crime prevention strategies in Singapore, as well as social control on the Crow Indian reservation in Montana. Prior to winning our Peace Research Grant, Dr. Austin received two National Science Foundation awards and two research awards from the United States Institute of Peace.

Dr. Austin wrote several books including;
Banana Justice: Field Notes on Philippine Crime and Custom (1999). Praeger; and Criminological Thought: Pioneers Past and Present (with Robert Mutchnick and Randy Martin), 2009. Prentice-Hall. He authored over thirty articles in the field of Criminology, Human Organization, Social Forces, Deviant Behavior, Criminal Justice and Behavior, Practicing Anthropology, and the International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.

 

After three decades in the classroom, Dr. Austin continues to enjoy teaching “comparative justice systems” and “ethnographical criminology” from undergraduate to doctoral levels. This summer (2013), he is looking forward to visiting the Philippines and talk with locals regarding their current thinking about adapting to life in a region known for its Muslim-Christian conflict.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW PEACE SEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

Christian Pangilinan, PhD.

 

ChristianP.Dr. Christian Pangilinan is awarded the IPRA Foundation Peace Re  search Grant for his research project in Tanzania. The title of his project is “Prospects for Refugee Integration in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.”

In this project, Dr. Pangilinan tries to answer questions, such as:

  1. How do refugees survive in Dar es Salaam?
  2. How do refugees’ lives intersect with those of their Tanzanian hosts?
  3. How do host community members feel about living with urban refugees?
  4. How do refugees feel about living  with host country nationals?
  5. How do refugees successfully integrate into local communities?

His project will lead to valuable conclusions on how refugees survive in Dar es Salaam and how peaceful relationships can be fostered between refugees and members of the host community.

 

In addition, the information collected will be used to provide recommendations on the implementation of programs to peacefully integrate refugees into Tanzania.

 

The dissemination of project findings to stakeholders will also facilitate the development of better strategies for providing assistance to refugees in urban areas as well as support efforts to rehabilitate Tanzania’s flawed refugee protection regime.

A LITTLE ABOUT DR. CHRISTIAN PANGILINAN
Dr. Pangilinan is an incoming C.V. Starr Lecturer at the Peking University School of Transnational Law. He earned his B.A. English Honors from the University of British Columbia, M.A. in English Literary Studies from the University of York, and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

 

Dr.Pangilinan was formerly the Interim Legal Services Manager and Georgetown Fellow at Asylum Access Tanzania – an organization that provided legal aid to refugees and asylum seekers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. While with Asylum Access, Christian worked primarily with refugees and asylum seekers from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who had “self-settled” in Dar es Salaam instead of remaining in or choosing to go to refugee camps. His research examines the extent to which these largely undocumented refugees have integrated into host communities culturally, economically and legally as well as nationals’ attitudes towards refugees. Through dialogue with both refugees and members of the host community, his project aims to shed light on the particularities of refugee-host relations in Dar es Salaam and provide practical recommendations on peaceful integration. Primary research for this project was completed in April.2013.

To Learn More About Us
Visit our website at www.iprafoundation.org
Contact Us
Dr. Linda M. Johnston
IPRA Foundation
In This Issue

Don’t Forget
  The next IPRA International Conference will be in Turkey on August 10-14, 2014.

Donate to IPRA Now with Paypal

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Or

send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:
IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #289
Superior, CO  80027

 

A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.
The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

 

Contact Us
Dr. Linda M. Johnston
IPRA Foundation
Text | Link
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IPRA Foundation | 2855 Rock Creek Circle #289 | Superior | CO | 80027

 

Website header
December 2012
A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear Friend,
Dr. Linda Johnston, President

The International Peace Research Association Foundation Board met in Japan several times during the biennial IPRA Conference. We had a lot of work to do and the Board members spent many hours working together to make decisions which will move the Foundation forward. As President, I am very grateful to have such a dedicated and hard-working Board. While I was at the conference, someone mentioned to me that they would not want to serve on the IPRAF Board because we work so hard. I took that as a compliment! And I am especially grateful that members of IPRA see the amount and quality of work we do.

As a Board, we have decided to hire another Fundraiser. Our last Fundraiser, Christie Roberts, was very successful. This was and continues to be a vital step for the Foundation. We will continue to seek contributions and will focus in the future on possible bequests from IPRA members. Those persons already in the peace research community are most likely to be our major contributors in the future, because they already understand the necessity and importance of the work we do. They are also the people who see the long term benefits of the work the IPRA Foundation supports.

At the next IPRA conference in Turkey, we plan to support a gathering of and presentation by Senesh Fellows and Small Peace Research Grant recipients. This will represent the first time we have gotten these scholars together to present the results of their research.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR FORMER DOROTHY MARCHUS SENESH FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENT

 

Amira Awad Osman, Ph.D.

AMIRA's PICTURE

 

The International Peace Research Association (IPRA) Foundation is proud to congratulate Amira Awad Osman, a former recipient of the Dorothy Marchus Senesh Fellowship, for her recent success in completing her degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Peace Studies.

 

Her research project was on “The Dynamics of Livelihood and Gender Relations in Sudan: The Case of Displacement Camps in Khartoum.” The abstract of her dissertation is as follows:

 

“This study investigates livelihood patterns and gender arrangements during displacement. The main focus is on the experience of internally displaced persons at Al-Salam and Mayo displaced persons’ camps at the outskirts of Khartoum, the capital of Sudan.

 

The study uses an integrated gender conceptual framework, which encompasses Moser’s triple role framework, practical and strategic gender interests and Kabeer’s social relations framework, as well as agency and empowerment concepts and finds that, at places of origin, people were mainly dependent on farming and rearing of animals to earn a living. However, differences existed between regions. This way of livelihood was associated with ‘traditional’ gender arrangements, where men were the main breadwinners with no clear reproductive roles. By contrast, women’s main roles were primarily reproductive. Then war, drought and famine affected people’s livelihoods and led to displacement.

 

At the displacement camps, more women than men were able to develop illegal and legal livelihood strategies. These new livelihood patterns upset the old gender patterns and led to emergence of new gender arrangements. Moreover, displaced women were able to build relationships within their gender and to form tajammu’at (women’s groups).

 

The NGOs (Non-Governmental Organisations) which were active in the displacement camps tended to perceive the displaced as powerless victims, but in practice, displaced women had become social agents and were able to demonstrate empowerment, resilience, and ability to cope with displacement conditions.”

A Little About Dr. Amira Awad Osman

 

Amira Awad Osman holds a Ph.D. in Peace Studies and a Diploma in Research Methods from the University of Bradford, UK. She also holds double Masters in Rural Development and in Gender and Development, respectively. Prior to entering her Ph.D. Program, Dr. Osman lived in Egypt and Sudan where she received her BA in Agricultural Science and an a Diploma in Statistical Research. She was also a former Council Member of the International Peace Research Foundation (IPRAF).

Dr. Osman is a Co-founder of the Gender Centre for Research and Training (GCRT) in Sudan. Her research areas include, but are not limited to, gender, peace building, civil society, internal displacement and refugees. She published three articles in the field of peace studies and conflict resolution. These articles include the “Sudanese Women in Civil Society and their Roles in Post-Conflict Reconstruction,” “Good Governance and the Right of the Displaced in Sudan,” and “Women in Arab Civil Society: A Case Study from Sudan.”

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR FORMER SMALL PEACE RESEARCH GRANT (SPRG) RECIPIENT FOR HER RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Karenjot Bhangoo Randhawa, PhD  

 

KAREN PIC

The International Peace Research Association (IPRA) Foundation is also proud to congratulate Dr. Karenjot Bhangoo Randhawa, a former Small Peace Research Grant (SPRG) recipient, for publishing her recent book titled Civil Society in Malerkotla, Punjab: Fostering Resilience through Religion.

 

In Civil Society in Malerkotla, Punjab: Fostering Resilience through Religion, Karenjot Bhangoo Randhawa explores the direct role that religion plays in conflict and peace that has often been difficult to isolate. This study extends previous work on peace and conflict resolution by looking at a town which has witnessed many outbreaks of violence in the past but still holds peace as the norm.

 

The former princely state of Malerkotla, Punjab is a place where riots did not occur during Partition. In this unique Muslim majority town, there are four distinct religious groups that live in close proximity to each other. Yet, the overall pattern of peaceful plurality in the town has resulted in the transcendence of violence even when the threat looms close by. The unique case of Malerkotla, Punjab provides an opportunity to look more closely and critically at Sikhs and their relationship with Muslims in India.

 

As a case study, this work captures the overall pattern of Sikh-Muslim interaction in a town that can transcend conflict and make peace the norm. Randhawa uncovers how religious associations, expressions and activities have helped to build social capital and stabilize peace. This book also emphasizes interreligious understanding, cross-cultural awareness, and conflict transformation, and discusses how interfaith communities can work together to bridge understanding in order to prevent violence.

 

A Little about Dr. Karenjot Bhangoo Randhawa

 

Karenjot B. Randhawa has completed a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University, a Master’s in Sociology and Dispute Resolution, and a Bachelor’s in Political Science from the University of Victoria. She has earned recognition as a successful Practitioner, Researcher, and Facilitator in the field of cross-cultural conflict resolution.

 

Her contributions in academia and the public sector in the U.S., Canada, and India have been significant, as she has continually supported and guided open discourse to explore social conflict, multicultural relations, and conflict resolution methodologies. Dr. Randhawa has excelled in multiple teaching and mentorship capacities, as she specializes in designing and delivering cross-cultural and conflict resolution trainings for a variety of public and private groups in the United States and internationally including healthcare organizations, university administration, social service programs and county departments.

 

Dr. Randhawa has conducted facilitations for city planning processes, immigrant rights policy initiatives and dialogue around racism and discrimination after the 9/11 attacks. In addition to her contributions in teaching and research, Karenjot has positively impacted the Los Angeles County Bar Association, Dispute Resolution Services (now the Center for Civic Mediation), where she served as Director of Mediation, Training and Evaluation for four years.

 

Karenjot contributed as a key resource to the community by successfully augmenting the mediator evaluation program, in addition to defining and implementing innovative processes and procedures to improve critical training programs in schools and community. She mediated in court mediation programs in Vancouver and Los Angeles and handled cases in the areas of construction, employment, civil harassment and family.

 

Not only is she currently serving as a mediator on the Los Angeles Superior Court Panel and a member of California’s State Bar Committee on Alternative Dispute Resolution, but also she teaches Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution, Pepperdine University. Her core areas of focus include cross-cultural conflict resolution and the role of religion in conflict and civil society.

 

Dr. Randhawa is the author of many books and articles. Her most recent is “Civil Society in Malerkotla, Punjab: Fostering Resilience Through Religion (Lexington, 2012). She is also a co-author of “Conflict Across Cultures: A Unique Bridging Experience.” (Nicolas Brealey Publishing, 2006); and Religion and Human Security: A Global Perspective (Oxford University Press, 2012).

  

Here is how to get this book at a discounted price:.  

ISBN 978-0-7391-6737-3 2012 140 pages Regular price: $55.00 / After discount: $44.00 

 

Special 20% OFF discount offer!*
To get discount, use code LEX20AUTH12 when ordering
*May not be combined with other offers and discounts, valid until 8/31/13  

 

ABOUT THE 2012 IPRA CONFERENCE IN JAPAN 

The 2012 IPRA conference that took place in Mie, Japan, from November 24-28, reunited 222 scholars and professionals in the field of conflict resolution and analysis who came from all over the world. Of all the people who attended the conference,  7 came from South America, 19 from Oceania, 23 from Africa and Middle East, 28 from Europe, 42 from North America, and 101came from Asia. It is very important to note that out of the Asian participants, 74 were either Japanese or residents of Japan. Kudos to our host country!  

 As Rachel Trueblood, the IPRA Foundation Treasurer General, points out, this conference was a complete success.

 

Ms. Trueblood writes: “Thanks to the excellent work of the 2 Secretaries General, Jake Lynch and Katsuya Kodama, a spotlight was placed on the need within IPRA for a strong, active, vital, participatory IPRA Council.  In the past, for example, some of the elected Council representatives were not even paid-up IPRA members.  By working together during the Conference with some IPRA Foundation board members on the spot, a system was created for the first time to check whether newly nominated Council representatives were indeed IPRA members (those current on their dues.)  This system ensured that a legal IPRA Council was duly elected.

 

Additionally, the same system allowed us to ensure that only IPRA members (those current on their dues) were allowed into the second, longer IPRA administrative business meeting to vote on all voting issues.  This system was a collaborative effort of dedicated individuals, and allowed everyone to feel confident that the process was fair.

 

Jake Lynch declined to run for Secretary General a second time.  Two members came forward proposing to be Co-Secretaries General and ran unopposed.  The two new Co-Secretaries General are Nesrin Kenar from Turkey and Ibrahim S. Shaw from U.K.  The next IPRA Conference will be in 2014 in Turkey, and it will be the 50th Anniversary of IPRA’s existence.

 

Attendees at the IPRA Conference were especially grateful for the graciousness and hospitality showered upon us by Katsuya Kodama (Conference organizer) and his wonderful staff.  They prepared three sumptuous receptions for us with all manner of wonderful food.  The first included a fantastic performance of Gagaku (Ancient Japanese Court Music) with Kangen (Gagaku Instrumental Music played on ancient instruments) and Bugaku (a stylized, elaborately costumed ritual dance accompanied by Gagaku, complete with elaborate winged creature headdress, fierce mask and sword.)  The second included an amazing ritual butchering of a giant tuna and a ritual breaking of the sake cask (by Jake.)  The third included videos of music from Latin America and a juggling performance.

 

Attendees were overjoyed to see old IPRA friends.  They made many great new connections with new friends as well.”

           

Many of these conference attendees also showed their satisfaction of how this conference was organized and carried out. Some of their experiences about the conference are quoted in the section below. 

Experiences about the 2012 IPRA Conference in Japan

“This IPRA conference in Japan was a unique opportunity for young scholars in the peace field to present their research. Scholars from forty-one countries attended the conference. Just being able to sit in a room with that many dedicated international researchers is a learning experience in itself. As president of the IPRAF Board, I make it a point to try to get to at least one presentation from each commission so that I can learn first-hand what scholars in that commission are interested in. One thing that I noticed in particular at this conference was what happened at lunch time. The conference organizers had planned for us to have wonderful box lunches each day. What I noticed was that people would pick up their box lunches and move into small discussion groups to either discuss a particular topic of research, get feedback on their presentation, or meet in small commission-related groups. The fact that we had the freedom of movement at lunch time, due to the box lunches, gave everyone the flexibility to choose their discussion topic and companions at lunch. Much of the research collaboration I noticed occurred during this meal time. I would definitely suggest that we provide box lunches at conferences in the future.”

                                                                   Linda M. Johnston

 

“IPRA conferences are always an important opportunity for me to listen to the presentations, and participate in discussions, with peace research colleagues from around the world. This involves plenary meetings, meetings of some twenty commissions that focus on a large array of important peace issues, and receptions where we all gather for meals, drinks, and conversations.

 

I always attend commission meetings on subjects about which I know the least.  This helps me to be informed of the broad peace context in which I must place the peace issues that are the focus of my research.  Very important to me this time were meetings of the Peace Journalism Commission.  I have long been concerned how the media provides my students with much more information on war and seriously disruptive conflicts than on very significant peace activity.  It was very helpful to me to acquire knowledge about this subject provided by peace journalism research of colleagues from around the world.

 

Again my experience at an IPRA conference motivates me to continue my service on the IPRA Foundation Board. We must do everything we can to insure that IPRA membership around the world increases.  If the possibility for world peace is to increase, the growth of IPRA, and financial support for its efforts is essential.”

                                                                     Chadwick Alger 

Fundraising Update

The IPRA Foundation Needs Your Support Today!

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today! 

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

 

Or send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:

IPRA Foundation  

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle, Unit 289
Superior, CO  80027- 4623

 

The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.  

 

About Us
To learn more about the International Peace Research Association Foundation, visit us at http://iprafoundation.org


Stay current on the latest news of the IPRA Foundation’s global research community!
Thank you for your interest in IPRA Foundation.

February 2012
Dear Friend,
Dr. Linda Johnston, PresidentThank you, thank you, thank you to all of our supporters who gave to the IPRA Foundation throughout 2011! Your support is so valuable not only to our budget but also in its endorsement of our work.
We have kicked 2012 off with a record number of applications for the 2012-13 Senesh Fellowship. While it makes it difficult to select one individual to receive the fellowship, it’s encouraging to see such a wide field of impressive young scholars from all over the world entering the peace studies field.

I’m also pleased to announced the final Small Peace Research Grant award of 2011:  to Amra Pandzo of Sarajevo for her research project on the evolution and future of the multi-cultural “Bosnian spirit”.  Read below for details of her work and research plans.  Please be aware that the timeline of our SPRG program has changed this year – please be sure to note the new deadlines given below.

Finally speaking of time-frames, I hope you all have the upcoming IPRA conference on your calendars for November!  It is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to share new research findings, build new relationships, and support each other.  More information will be coming as the IPRA Secretaries-General share it with us; keep reading our semi-monthly newsletters to stay abreast of the latest developments.

In peace,

Dr. Linda M. Johnston

President

Small Peace Research Grants:
New Deadlines!

The IPRA Foundation has made some changes to its grant-making schedule for the Small Peace Research Grants.  The new deadlines and award announcement dates are as follows:

Period 1 – Applications accepted until Feb. 28

Award made by March 31
Period 2 – Applications accepted until June 30
Award made by July31
Period 3 – Applications accepted until Oct. 31
Award made by Nov. 30

 

Individuals wishing to apply for a SPRG in 2012 or thereafter are advised to note the new dates.  More detailed information about the SPRG program can be found on our website at:  www.iprafoundation.org/small_grants.shtml.

 

New Research Grant Awarded –

Congratulations to Amra Pandzo! 

 

The IPRA Foundation is proud to announce the award of a SPRG to Amra Pandzo of Sarajevo for her research in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  The excerpt describing her project below is taken from her proposal.

“The recent war in BiH (like the two previous world wars) and the success of ethnic cleansing struck a severe blow to the historic development of ethnic interaction and the existent social capital. The war itself denied and sought to destroy the culturally rich fabric and general spirit of goodwill in BiH by insisting on black and white categories, fear, and ‘purifying’ territories of the threatening ‘others.’

“While there is no doubt that the war and this narrative have played a very strong and traumatic role in Bosnian life in the last twenty years, it is seen by many residents in contrast with what they remember (pre-war) or still embrace as their tradition of tolerance and diversity. Today, most young people have minimal exposure to ‘others’ and little sense of ‘active coexistence’ where neighbours of different religions and ethnicities experientially know each others’ cultures, holidays, traditions, and ways of living. Despite nationalist politics and the current segregation of society, the sense of Bosnian spirit remains in some pockets, but it is definitely viewed with more skepticism given the recent past. This project seeks to consider this social dilemma and the possible steps forward into a more peaceful future.

“Some of the answers sought in the oral history-telling:
– what is this Bosnian spirit (how is it defined by residents of BiH) and why is it crucial for the continuance of the Bosnian state?
– What are the roots of this spirit (how was it created)? Was it in Islam’s unique appearance in the Balkans or in Socialism’s ethos of brotherhood and unity?
– how is it passed from generation to generation and how can it be maintained in these new circumstances?
– what are the challenges to keeping this spirit alive today, in the changed, postwar situation of BiH?
– what is the role of fear and victimization in blocking this Bosnian spirit?”

Ms. Pandzo is the director of the Association for Dialogue in Family and Society Small Steps.  She holds two Master’s degrees in comparative literature and in political science. If you have questions about the project or helpful suggestions for Ms. Pandzo, please email her at amrap70(AT)gmail.com.

Psychological Methods Survey –

Please Participate!

Susann Fiedler of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn, Germany requested assistance from the IPRA Foundation community.  She writes, “You may be aware of the debate going on in the psychological community regarding a recent article that addressed the question of whether current practices should be revised (Simmons et al., 2011, Psychological Science). The article has led to diverse reactions among psychologists; and there is much speculation concerning the popular opinion of “psychologists as a whole” towards the recommendations put forth by the article.

“The Max Planck Institute, in cooperation with the Open Science Framework (http://openscienceframework.org/ ), is conducting a worldwide survey of psychologists to determine the extent to which the recommendations in the above mentioned article are supported by the psychological community. Everyone’s opinion is important; and it is not necessary that you have read the article in order to participate.”

Please help assess current opinions about psychological research practices and the quality of publications in psychological journals by participating in a short survey!  It takes approximately 10 minutes and is completely anonymous. Click here to link to the survey:  http://ww3.unipark.de/uc/extern/9afd/. The survey is open until February 9, 2012.

 

Participants may also enter into a raffle to win one of three $50 Amazon gift certificates! 

 

In This Issue
New Grant Deadlines!
Research Grant Awarded!
Survey: Psychological Methods
What You Can Do
Save the Date!

The IPRA Foundation Needs Your Support Today!

 

 

 

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Buy Now

Or send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:

IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #126
Superior, CO  80027

 A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.

The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

 

 

DON’T FORGET!

Nov. 24 – Nov. 28, 2012

 

 

2012 International Peace Research Association International Conference

 

Ise Sun Arena in Ise City, Mie Prefecture, Japan
Please check IPRA’s new website (http://ipra-peace.com/)
for details and updates.

Stay current on the latest news of the IPRA Foundation’s global research community!
Visit Our Website

 

 

December 2011
Dear Friend,
Dr. Linda Johnston, PresidentIt’s that time again – another year flown by!  I hope that your year has been happy and your work has been productive and fulfilling.
This year the IPRA Foundation, on the one hand, is celebrating a number of good things:  we awarded Small Peace Research Grants to scholars in Kenya and Turkey for timely, innovative research on peace-building in those countries.  We are also proud to congratulate our 11th Senesh Fellow on the completion of her Master’s thesis (more details about her work, below).  And finally, we have just received a big contribution of library materials from the late Ted Herman for the IPRA Archive at the University of Colorado (more on that below too).
On the other hand, the IPRA Foundation still struggles to achieve its fundraising goals.  Unfortunately, IPRAF is not self-sustaining but instead relies on contributions from individuals all over the world.  Individuals like you.  In this season of gift-giving, I ask you to please consider making a gift to the IPRA Foundation of whatever size is comfortable to you.
Indeed, Ted’s generous bequest is important because it reminds me that we each have something to offer.  So often we think that, if we don’t have thousands or millions of dollars to contribute, then we must have nothing to give.  But Ted’s gift is a strong reminder that when it comes to supporting the IPRA Foundation, creativity and generosity work quite well together.  How can you contribute to the IPRA Foundation’s sustainability?  What legacy will you leave behind?

 

In peace,

Dr. Linda M. Johnston

President

The IPRA Foundation Needs Your Support Today!

Supporting the essential work of our professional community is more critical in today’s political environment than ever before.  Please contribute to the IPRA Foundation today!

International and U.S.-based donors can easily and securely support the IPRA Foundation. Click the PayPal button below to make a secure contribution to our General Fund.

Donate

Or send a check made payable to “IPRA Foundation” to:

IPRA Foundation

c/o Rachel Trueblood,Treasurer
2855 Rock Creek Circle #126
Superior, CO  80027

A contribution form to include with your check can be downloaded here.

The IPRA Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions are tax-deductible in the United States. 

 

Ted Herman’s Bequest to the IPRA Library Archive

Leave Your Own Legacy: Contribute Your Library of Peace Materials to the Collection!

The IPRA Foundation is the grateful recipient of a major infusion of peace-related books and scholarly works from the library of the late Ted Herman.  Mr. Herman, a long-time supporter of the Foundation, bequeathed his peace library to the IPRA Archive at the University of Colorado-Boulder.  The Archive now includes hundreds of works, including many from IPRA Foundation founders Elise and Kenneth Boulding, all of which are made available to students and researchers alike.

 

If you are wondering how best to preserve your own collection and make it useful to the peace research community, please consider a bequest to the IPRA Archive at CU-Boulder.  This is a wonderful and thoughtful way to ensure that your carefully collected library of peace-related publications is maintained in a professional setting and continues to foster further scholarship.  Please note that any library bequests must include funds to ship the materials to Boulder, Colorado where they can be housed.  If you would like more information about how to do this, please contact the IPRA Foundation’s Treasurer at:  treasurer(at)iprafoundation.org.

 

 

Language-Learning Survey

Your Participation Needed!

Dorota Smiejan, degree candidate at the University of Hamburg’s Department of Applied Linguistics, Section of Investigation in Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages, is conducting a research survey exploring the use of languages in communication in international organizations. The short survey (only 17 questions) is open to members of international organizations and groups such as IPRA.

The survey, which is in English, Spanish and German, can be accessed at:  http://www.q-set.eu/q-set.php?sCode=QCKBSYRADJEX. It will be open until 1 February 2012. Your participation will be greatly appreciated by the researcher!

Congratulations to 2010-2011 Senesh Fellow Isioma Kemakolam!

 

Isioma, who is from Nigeria, has completed her thesis capping her Master’s degree program at Coventry University. She discusses her path of study and her research on UN Resolution 1325 to protect women’s rights in Liberia and Sierra Leone:

  

At the beginning, my proposed thesis topic had been Building the Capacity of Traditional Institutions for Enhanced Participation of Women in Peacekeeping but peace and conflict events in the recent past in Africa, especially West Africa, gave me so much concern that I began to question the ability of the UNSCR 1325 to protect the rights of women. Hence in May 2011, I changed my thesis topic and embarked on a study on The Implementation of United Nations Resolution 1325 and the Protection of Women’s Rights: A Comparative Study of Liberia and Sierra Leone.

“The study examined the implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and its role in the protection of women’s rights in Sierra Leone and Liberia. It sought to determine the extent of its domestication and implementation challenges as well as its impact on the reduction of gender inequality. Using the intersection theory, it examined how multiple identities of women and systems of patriarchy interconnect to violate the rights of women. With feminist theory as a lens, it offered an understanding of why these violations occur, discussed how these identities and systems of oppression interlink to sustain women’s human rights violation and examines the role of UNSCR 1325 in the protection of these rights. Besides being essentially qualitative in approach, the analysis of the findings draws from the comparative method of exploring the similarities and differences in the issues pursued in the study with regards to the objectives.

“While UNSCR 1325 has achieved successes with regards to internalisation within national or domestics laws, as is evident in the study, a lack of accountability mechanisms, inadequate financial and personnel resources, and cultural practices contribute to the ineffective implementation of the resolution in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Given the peculiarities of Liberia and Sierra Leone and the fact that addressing women’s issues would require a comprehensive and multi-sectorial response which would take account of all the institutions that play a functioning role in the domestication or implementation of the Resolution, the study calls for incorporation of intersection theory as an operational framework in the implementation of the Resolution to aid the reduction of incidents of violence against women.

“Flowing from the above findings I plan to work with governmental and women’s organizations in Liberia and Sierra Leone to address issues raised in the study for enhanced implementation of UNSCR 1325.”

In This Issue
What You Can Do to Help
Ted Herman’s Gift to the IPRAF Archive
Language-Learning Survey
Congrats to Senesh Fellow!
New Publications
Save the Date!
Fellowship Application Open

New Publications from the IPRAF Community


Zahid Shahab Ahmed, a doctoral student at the University of New England in Australia, has recently published an article entitled: “Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA): Lessons from Pakistan” in the
Peace and Conflict Review
(vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 12-27). Mr. Ahmed was the recipient of an IPRA Foundation Small Peace Research Grant in 2007 where he focused on international aid interventions in Pakistan.

 

Access this paper through the following link.
Dr. Ibrahim Seaga Shaw, a member of IPRA’s  Governing Council, has a new book forthcoming – Human Rights Journalism: Advances in Reporting Distant Humanitarian Interventions.  In it, Dr. Shaw draws on a number of case studies to illustrate the power of the media to encourage education and engagement of the general public in defense of human rights and the prevention of violence.  The book can be ordered online
Dr. Shaw is Senior Lecturer in Media and Politics at Northumbria University in Newcastle, UK. He holds a PhD from the Sorbonne and is co-editor of Expanding Peace Journalism (2011).
 

SAVE THE DATE!

Nov. 24 – Nov. 28, 2012

 

 

2012 International Peace Research Association International Conference

 

Ise Sun Arena in Ise City, Mie Prefecture, Japan
Please check IPRA’s new website (http://ipra-peace.com/)
for details and updates.

Stay current on the latest news of the IPRA Foundation’s global research community!

Call for 2012-13 Senesh Fellowship Applications!

 

Due January 15, 2012

 


The Dorothy Senesh Fellowship provides school expenses in the amount of $5,000 per year for two years and is available to women from developing countries who have completed a Bachelor’s degree, who have been accepted into a graduate program and whose graduate work is to be focused on issues related to the goals of IPRA. 

Awards are considered based on need; therefore students with substantial funding sources are less likely to be considered for the award. More information can be found on the IPRA Foundation website.

 

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